While it had been a while since I last attended C2E2, attending this year opened my eyes to what pop culture conventions have become in recent years: a place where those who share the same nerd passions can come together and experience what binds them. C2E2 had something for everyone. 



Simon Moore's situation seems to keep getting worse and worse with each issue of Hadrian's Wall. He's been given the runaround, betrayed, tricked, and manipulated by members of the crew, as it relates to the death of Edward Madigan, a member of the team, as well as the husband of his ex-wife, Annabelle. This would be enough for anyone to deal with, but there's also the lingering problem of Simon's pill addiction. Oh, and rebels from the Earth-settled planet Theta have taken over the ship, making things much more difficult. Good times, it seems, for Simon.

What fools these mortals be.

Magic.  It’s a word that can breed wonder and fear, suspicion and desire.  It’s oft overlooked by those that find themselves at its mercy, and those that practice its arts tend to come to unnatural ends.  This is precisely the kind of world that Leonie O’Moore gives to us in her new comic book, Invoked, where a family at the turn of the century inherits much more than the large mansion from an eccentric aunt. There are already tenants there, and not all of them are there voluntarily.

In issue #2 of Orphan Black: Deviations, tensions rise to extreme levels. No one knows who to trust or where answers may lie. As the Clone Club is busy trying to put the pieces of their complicated lives together, Heli Kennedy’s brilliant script conveys the idiosyncrasies of each character. Alison’s quips provide humorous moments amid intense interrogation of Sarah. And Beth is starting to develop more, as we see how she fits into the group. Since we don’t get to see these interactions in the show, it is refreshing to have her character so active and involved—even if she is just really angry and tense so far. We also witness her coping mechanism, which shows how much her character is struggling on the inside. Hopefully, once Sarah is welcomed into the group, Beth will be able to release some of her pain.

When I first heard that When Wrong Is Right, now playing at the Eclectic Company Theatre in Valley Village, CA, involved a dance marathon, my thoughts immediately went to the movie, They Shoot Horses, Don’t They? Indeed, this play and that film have a lot in common. They’re both set during the Great Depression, and both stories have an air of hopelessness and despair. When Wrong Is Right, however, uses those elements to weave a very different kind of story.

Quality Time with Family Ties is a weekly podcast in which three guys watch and review Family Ties - the '80s sitcom that made Michael J. Fox a star.

"Oh, Brother (Part 2)." Today on QTWFT, we learn . . . That we want to be put down - just like Old Shep.

Tread Perilously is a podcast in which hosts Erik Amaya and author Justin Robinson watch the “worst” episodes of popular TV shows, attempting to determine if they would continue to watch the series based on the most off-key moments.

This Week: Doctor Who's "Blink"

Tread Perilously month concludes with one of the most beloved of Doctor Who tales: "Blink."

While disco was hot and bell bottoms were cool, the late 1970s saw an influx of popular culture milestones on the silver screen that included the release of Star Wars, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Halloween, Apocalypse Now, and Alien. Director Ridley Scott introduced a new kind of science fiction space horror in which he re-appropriated and re-imagined the slasher genre. With this film, Scott explored themes of survival, isolationism, the final girl concept, and the uncanny valley, as well as showcased the visual aesthetic created by German artist H. R. Giger. In Alien, Scott introduced audiences to LV-426, one of the three moons orbiting Calpamos, but it was in James Cameron’s 1986 Aliens that revisited LV-426, no longer devoid of human life, but inhabited with a terraforming colony called Hadley's Hope. Needless to say, there wasn’t a whole lot of hope or colonists by the time Ripley returned to the xenomorph-infested moon.

"I heard that Fox was gonna do Alien vs. Predator, which really depressed me, because I was very proud of the movies. I’ve nothing against building a movie on a video game, but at the time it was, as Jim Cameron said, I think publicly, ‘Why would you want to do that'? It’s like making Alien Meets the Wolfman.”

Though Alien and Aliens were released in 1979 and 1986, respectively, it was in the 1990s that Aliens, as a universe, solidified and proliferated itself across a variety of other narrative media and paratexts. While the '90s saw the release of the Alien 3 and Alien: Resurrection films, it is easily these other forms of storytelling that provided the greatest contributions to the Aliens franchise, both in tangible products to sell, as well as lore and stories to expand the universe (canonical or not). Dark Horse Comics contributed the majority to the narrative through their various Aliens and Aliens vs. Predator comics, an IP they still generate material for to this day. Bantam Books released a plethora of Aliens books in the '90s before DH Press took the reins in the 2000s.

Page 1 of 518
Go to top