‘Of Bread, Blood, and The Hunger Games: Critical Essays on the Suzanne Collins Trilogy’ - Book Review

The Hunger Games film series may have wrapped up last month, but there’s still a wealth of Hunger Games material for fans to devour beyond the three novels by author Suzanne Collins and the four feature films based upon them. Of Bread, Blood, and The Hunger Games: Critical Essays on the Suzanne Collins Trilogy, published by McFarland and edited by Mary F. Pharr and Leisa A. Clark, is a collection of well-written and thought-provoking essays focused on The Hunger Games series and is a perfect example of the kind of enriching and delicious remedy that will help those fans experiencing the effects of Hunger Games withdrawal in this post-Mockingjay world we live in.

The format of McFarland’s Of Bread, Blood, and The Hunger Games, where the volume is composed of a number of critical essays examining a certain franchise or fandom, is one that is both extremely common and successful these days. I’ve raved about Smart Pop Books’ endeavors in this medium before, and McFarland is no stranger in the field, having released dozens of essay collections covering a multitude of subjects and fandoms. Of Bread, Blood, and The Hunger Games is a well-crafted example of McFarland’s essay collection line, as well as a detailed and diverse exploration of the world of Panem and Katniss Everdeen. Covering a diverse number of topics, including politics, economics, gender identity, feminism, the cultural impact of food, and more, all filtered through the lens of the characters and world Suzanne Collins created, Of Bread, Blood, and The Hunger Games is sure to engross even the casual Hunger Games fan and invite them to delve even deeper into Everdeen’s experiences and the oppressive society she ultimately fights against.

While the book’s exploration of Panem and its inhabitants is more than adequate, Of Bread, Blood, and The Hunger Games also excels at engaging the passionate Hunger Games fan community by including several essays that focus on comparing and contrasting Katniss and company with franchises like The Running Man, Battle Royale,  Ender’s Game, and more (a fairly common practice among the fanbase). Unlike the discussion found in chat rooms and comment sections online, these essays don’t set out to determine one property's validity over the other but, instead, expand appreciation for each story mentioned by examining how they interact, inspire, or differ from The Hunger Games series.

All in all, Of Bread, Blood, and The Hunger Games: Critical Essays on the Suzanne Collins Trilogy is a must read for Hunger Games die-hards and sure to be enjoyed by even the casual fan. If you simply can’t get enough of the original Hunger Games book series, then you do not want to pass up Of Bread, Blood, and The Hunger Games.

You can learn more about Of Bread, Blood, and The Hunger Games: Critical Essays on the Suzanne Collins Trilogy by visiting McFarland’s official website.

Last modified on Thursday, 17 December 2015 19:55

Bryant Dillon, Fanbase Press President
Favorite Comic BookPreacher by Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon
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