‘The Grand Budapest Hotel:’ Film Review

If you still haven’t seen Wes Anderson’s The Grand Budapest Hotel, find a theater near you that’s still playing it and run there. If you’re like me and running isn’t your thing, you can always check it out when it releases on DVD/Blu-ray today.

I was lucky enough to catch it on the opening weekend at the Cinerama Dome at the Arclight Hollywood. This was actually the first flick I got to check out in the Dome. Pretty neat theater, and they had the miniature model hotel that they used for filming in the lobby! Anyway, back to the movie.

The Grand Budapest Hotel is about the Grand Budapest Hotel’s world-renowned concierge Gustave H (Ralph Fiennes) and lobby boy Zero Moustafa’s (Tony Revolori) adventures between the wars in the fictional Republic of Zubrowka. Anderson’s usual band of misfits shows up, including Jeff Goldblum, Owen Wilson, Edward Norton, Jason Schwartzman, and more. And, of course, Bill Murray!

I’ve always loved Wes Anderson’s movies for the fact that they embrace what filmmaking is all about. Movies are supposed to be fun and weird. They’re supposed to take you on an adventure that makes you forget about reality for a little while. I know going into a Wes Anderson movie that I’m going to get a movie that had a lot of hard work and dedication put into it for the audience’s enjoyment. Anderson has one of the most unique and quirky styles of anyone working today. Above all, he respects the craft of storytelling and delivers the goods with Grand Budapest. It’s as if he woke up one day and asked himself, “How much quirkier can I make a movie?” and then tripled that. The Grand Budapest Hotel is a hilarious, twisted, and fun movie. On top of a great story, the movie has some beautiful visuals, as you’d expect from an Anderson movie. He mixes his usual wide format style with a more classic aspect ratio for the flashback scenes, adding a more authentic feel to those scenes. I saw the movie with a cinematographer friend of mine who was drooling the entire time.

Walking out of the theater, I didn’t hear anyone bad mouthing anything in this movie, which is rare nowadays when everyone loves nitpicking every little detail of everything. The Grand Budapest Hotel will definitely be making it into my Blu-ray collection next month.


Overall:  9/10

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