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‘X-Files: Season 10 #8’ – Advance Comic Book Review (Everything You Ever Wanted to Know about Deep Throat . . . Kind of)

Prior to diving, keyboard first, into my review of IDW’s X-Files: Season 10 #8, my original game plan was to confess my undying infatuation with an FBI special agent by the name of Dana Scully.  After much internal debate, I felt this wouldn’t be appropriate, seeing as my actual obsession is with Gillian Anderson herself, and I wouldn’t want to start this review off with any misleading statements.

More importantly, based on the title, readers might erroneously presume this review was about something else entirely.  (Granted, it might make for a much more appealing discussion; nonetheless, my bet is the Fanboy Comics editors, Gillian Anderson, and her lawyers might feel otherwise.)

There is, however, a method to my madness, and that is to educate you on my deep love of The X-Files, in general.  The television series, which debuted in 1993, was one of the first shows I remember becoming instantly enamored with at the young age of . . . well, let’s just say a young age.  Looking back, it was also the first series that truly started making me self-aware of what a true nerd I really was, and was destined to be.  It should also be noted that The X-Files ushered in the era of what we now call the serialized drama.

Thus, when IDW announced they would be working with the creator of the The X-Files himself, Chris Carter, to start delivering stories directly following the events of The X-Files' Ninth Season series finale and I Want to Believe sequel, you can understand how a certain someone might have lost all control of his bodily functions. (Yes, I'm pointing at me.)

Having recently just re-read the first seven issues of the new IDW series, I’m also happy to report that the feel of the show has been accurately captured, at least as accurately as one could hope in the graphic novel format.  Unfortunately, the same can’t be said for a certain X-Files comic book series that was first attempted back in the 1990s by a popular baseball card company that shall remain unnamed.  (*cough* Topps *cough*)

The first five issues of the new series brought back our two favorite alien-chasing special agents – amongst a whole horde of other familiar conspiratorial characters - to the FBI’s unexplainable cases department and re-established a somewhat familiar story arc with a new twist.  Starting with Issue #6, the super agents have found themselves dealing with some standalone stories, as well.

Issue #8 is an interesting segment that brings back two informant faces who leaked information to Mulder over the course of 9 years serving U.S. tax payers.  Unless you’ve been living under a rock without a TV or DVD player, those two informants are none other than Mr. X and Deep Throat.  Alas, they are not back in quite the way you might expect, as seems to be the case with a few old characters, so you owe it to yourself to actually read the series from the beginning.

The outlying story of #8 deals with some type of super-virus that causes its host to become overly aggressive.  Add to the fact the virus is being tested on grade school kids and another side effect of the drug is that it turns the little ones’ faces into some grotesque version of Eddie Munster, and you definitely get that Children of the Corn chill down your back.

If I had to pick one issue thus far that has most captured the true essence of the show, it would have to be this issue, if for no other reason than more questions are asked than answered.  Though the first seven issues captured the core elements of the original characters and plotlines, I couldn’t help but feel information was being divulged and spoon-fed to me more readily in contrast to the cryptic way storylines were handled on the television series.  Some of that may have to do with the format itself in that there is less space to advance the story and new content is delivered on a monthly basis versus a weekly one.

While I enjoyed the subplot about learning minor tidbits on the origin of Deep Throat (and no, not the origin of THAT, but that may be a topic I research later), where this issue slips up is in the artwork.  Being that I’m thrilled to even have The X-Files back in some form or another, I’m not going to nit-pick or point fingers, but the art in this issue seems crude and sketch-like when compared to the work done in prior issues, specifically the Flukeworm chapters.  Yes, I could tell – for the most part – the difference between Mulder and Scully, but it’s hard to eat McDonalds once you’ve had Ruth’s Chris. (Not that I can afford to eat at Ruth’s Chris, so that metaphor might not have been the wisest choice.)

While the title of this review may have proved a bit deceptive for some, I'm proud to say that it has done so in the true deceptive spirit of the franchise.  And, for that, X-Files fans have much to be thankful for in 2014, as IDW's series featuring the world's most infamous FBI agents continues to gain steam with every issue. 

Last modified on Wednesday, 08 January 2014 16:15

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