‘That Bulletproof Kid #3:’ Comic Book Review

Each issue of That Bulletproof Kid gives a grander scope to the adventure. Our hero, Anth, a.k.a. Bulletproof, has gone from being an ordinary superhero’s sidekick to being caught up in—and possibly the center of—intergalactic conflict and intrigue, involving some old grudges and a mysterious and powerful item/device/possible weapon. He also has a paper due for a really strict teacher.

That’s what I like about That Bulletproof Kid: the juxtaposition of these epic superhero adventures with the everyday problems of an average high school student who’s just trying to pass his classes while fitting in and having a life. It makes the whole thing seem more real and more accessible. It also provides some great humor.

Fresh off a battle with the villainous Monochrome and a bunch of “living slug abominations,” Bulletproof is taken for an off-the-record, not-entirely-friendly conversation with a member of the Tribunal—the organization that oversees superheroes, and apparently most of the galaxy. A lot of people don’t trust Bulletproof and are wary of his power and where it came from. Despite that mistrust, Bulletproof’s loyalties remain with the Tribunal; however, not everyone shares that loyalty—and whether or not they’re even deserving of that loyalty remains to be seen. One thing is certain: nothing is as it seems.

I’m definitely hooked on That Bulletproof Kid. The story is compelling, the artwork is a lot of fun, and, in addition to the ongoing story, it also provides us with some great snippets of the superhero adventures—and high school drama—that Anth/Bulletproof has to deal with on a daily basis. This issue features the aforementioned slug abominations, along with a rather odd and funny discussion between a group of high school girls about the bizarre themes they want at their weddings.

My only criticism is that the wait seems too long between issues. Of course, I understand. It takes time to put together a comic, especially now that Matt Kyme is doing double duty as writer and illustrator. I want to know what happens next, though. So, while technically a criticism, that’s also perhaps the highest praise I can offer.

That Bulletproof Kid #3 is now available in both print and digital formats from IF? Commix.

Go to top