‘Tomorrow #1:’ Comic Book Review

Tomorrow is about a superhero, created through time travel and alien DNA. Time traveling from the year 3000, two scientists genetically engineered a child and endowed him with the natural abilities of some of the alien races they’d made contact with. This issue serves as a brief (less than 20 pages) introduction to the titular character and shows us a few of the people who are interested in Tomorrow, for good or evil.

The framework is that of a morning talk show, on which Tomorrow has agreed to appear—which serves as a relatively clever way of getting his exposition out of the way without seeming too heavy handed. As he’s interviewed live, important people all over the city of New Providence, California, watch him and express their opinions.

First, there’s Caliber, another superhero, who evidently also has his own comic series. His series is already on the third issue, which I find slightly ironic, considering that the author calls his world “the Tomorrowverse,” and Tomorrow himself has only just started his adventures. But, I digress . . .

Also watching the interview is Dr. Jordan, a mad scientist who resents that Tomorrow keeps putting the kibosh on his experiments, just because they keep escaping and causing destruction. Then, there’s the Nigerian ambassador and his son who also has special abilities. Finally, there’s a group of people who appear to be supervillains, determined to . . . well, their ultimate plan has yet to be revealed, but it probably involves Tomorrow’s destruction.

This is a good introduction to the characters and premise and a fairly fun first issue. Not a whole lot happens in terms of actual plot, but there’s the promise of more to come in the next issue, along with plenty of action. The artwork is a little sparse, just black-and-white outlines that almost make it look unfinished. Still, it does its job well enough.

Since the story itself is so short, also included is another short story about Greek gods trying to create a new hero like Hercules on Earth in the present day. As is frequently the case when comics offer bonus stories, I found this one to be more interesting and compelling than the main story of Tomorrow’s adventures. I look forward to seeing how both play out in the next issue.

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