Steven W. Alloway, Fanbase Press Contributor

Steven W. Alloway, Fanbase Press Contributor

A little over a year ago (Wow, has it really been that long?), I reviewed the first issue in a new Star Trek comic called Star Trek: Waypoint. Released for Trek’s 50th anniversary, it was a collection of new, standalone short stories and adventures from each of the series: TOS, TNG, DS9, Voyager, and Enterprise. (No Discovery, sorry.) I loved that first issue and had nothing but great things to say about it. So, when the full collection of Waypoint comics came up for review, naturally, I jumped on it.

In general, I find that the adventures in The Rook are better when they feature more of stalwart protagonist Restin Dane and less of his grandfather, Bishop Dane. While this volume starts out with a very heavy dose of Bishop, mercifully, he becomes, for the most part, less important and less prominent as things progress.

Adamant, the world’s most indestructible superhero, has been displaced in time and now finds himself in a dark, dystopian future he can barely understand, full of deadly machines and talking frogs. When we last left our hero, he was having trouble wrapping his mind around the fact that his former arch-nemesis, Dr. Alpha, is now the leader of the underground resistance trying to keep people safe from the evil new regime. And as if that wasn’t enough, it turns out that the person responsible for this evil regime is none other than a future version of Adamant himself.

The social commentary in The Infinite Loop has never been subtle. The first story arc was a metaphor for gay rights, as Teddy and Ano had to choose whether to remain safe by keeping their forbidden love hidden away, or to risk everything by fighting openly for others to enjoy those same rights. Now, “Nothing but the Truth” takes on various aspects of the current political climate, and how the wealthy and powerful use the media to control the masses and distract people from what’s really going on.

A couple of years ago, I reviewed the first issue of a time travel comic called The Infinite Loop. Then, unfortunately, I missed the opportunity to review the rest of the story arc. But I liked the first issue enough that, even though I wasn’t reviewing it, I still kept up with the comic on my own. It was a beautiful blend of existential philosophy, social commentary, pop culture references, and, of course, crazy sci-fi shenanigans.

When I looked up this comic online, the synopsis promised time-hopping and alternate timelines. In this first issue, at least, there is nothing like that. Still, there’s plenty to hold your interest and keep you entertained.

If you’re reading this review to try to decide whether or not to read Mark Millar’s original Kingsman: The Secret Service comic, chances are it’s because (much like me) you’ve seen and loved the movie. This means your main question will likely be, “How does the comic compare to the movie?” And the answer is… pretty well.

Right from the beginning of this anthology, writer/creator Corey Lewis admits that his brain can be kind of all over the place. Sun Bakery is his attempt to collect the projects that have arisen from those rather scattered thoughts, all in one place. The result is a number of strange and surreal worlds that don’t always make sense, but are nonetheless entertaining.

I hesitate to call this a Steampunk story, as purists will note that its 1920s setting is a little late to qualify; however, it certainly has many of the elements of Steampunk, as well as a similar overall sense of fun and adventure. Whatever you call it, it’s brilliant and entertaining.

As time travel stories go, Legend of Novo is fairly simple and straightforward, at least so far. That may seem like something of a paradox to some of you (No pun intended.), but the basic premise is as simple as a time travel story can be.

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