Steven W. Alloway, Fanbase Press Contributor

Steven W. Alloway, Fanbase Press Contributor

When I first volunteered to review this book, all I knew about it was that it was an anthology of Steampunk stories, including one story by an author whose work I enjoy (Madeleine Holly-Rosing, creator of the Boston Metaphysical Society comic). That alone was enough to pique my interest. But as it turns out, Some Time Later is more than that.

Even though it’s called Vixen: The Movie, this isn’t exactly a movie. It’s actually an animated web series, with episodes of around five minutes apiece, assembled here in a single, cohesive structure. You might think that would be cumbersome, but in fact, it’s pretty seamless for the most part. The only clue that this isn’t just a regular animated superhero movie is the fact that there are two or three completely independent story arcs within the space of a little over an hour.

The best way to describe this franchise is “Hogwarts for superheroes.” By taking the DC heroes that we know and love, transmuting them to high school age, and putting them all together at “Super Hero High,” the film definitely gives off a Harry Potter vibe, especially in the beginning. Still, by the end, it manages to find its own footing.

When I first heard that When Wrong Is Right, now playing at the Eclectic Company Theatre in Valley Village, CA, involved a dance marathon, my thoughts immediately went to the movie, They Shoot Horses, Don’t They? Indeed, this play and that film have a lot in common. They’re both set during the Great Depression, and both stories have an air of hopelessness and despair. When Wrong Is Right, however, uses those elements to weave a very different kind of story.

The main story of this comic, The Flying She-Devils: Raid on Marauder Island, concerns a group of female air pirates in the South Pacific in the wake of World War II. Honestly, for me, that much alone is enough to sell me on this comic. Others may need more convincing, though, so I’ll expand on it a bit.

For the last year or two, Dark Horse has been publishing a comic called The Rook which is, in my opinion, everything a good time travel story should be; however, as it turns out, like several of my favorite Dark Horse titles, this one is actually a reboot of a classic comic from back in the day. Furthermore, as they often do, they’ve now begun reprinting the original comics to coincide with the reboot.

I’ve always been fascinated by the henchpeople employed by supervillains in superhero stories. They’re usually just background, incidental to the action: an obstacle for the hero to overcome before moving on to bigger game. But what drives someone to go into that line of work? What are their lives like outside of their jobs? Does it pay well? Henchgirl attempts to answer some of these questions and weaves a thoroughly entertaining story in the process.

I reviewed the first issue of this comic in July of last year. Then, due to various circumstances, I never had a chance to continue the story. I very much wanted to, though, which is why I was excited for the chance to review this first volume, collecting the first six issues of the comic together. Though it wasn’t perfect, I saw a lot of potential in the first issue, and I’m happy to report that subsequent issues have lived up to that potential admirably.

Doc Yeti is the kind of bizarre story that just can’t help but draw you in. It has everything: noir, action, mystery, comedy… and yetis. I don’t think I’ve ever read a comic about yeti culture before. It’s intriguing, to say the least.

This comic reminds me a good deal of the webcomic, Girl Genius. Both are set in sort-of-Steampunk worlds (though Girl Genius prefers the term “Gaslamp fantasy”) and both feature young female protagonists who are clever, ambitious, and just waiting to unlock their full potential. Also, both have absolutely fantastic artwork, which is essential in stories like this.

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