Steven W. Alloway, Fanbase Press Contributor

Steven W. Alloway, Fanbase Press Contributor

Ansel lives in a fairytale world, full of gnomes and trolls, giants and dragons. Every year, each person turning 18 chooses a magical quest, where they strike out into the world to seek their fortune—and find themselves. Ansel’s not like the other 18-year-olds, though. Instead of the traditional fairytale garb, he wears a suit and a tie. He tinkers with bizarre magical devices, such as wristwatches and cigarette lighters. And for his quest, he wants to journey to a strange and unknown land of towering glass buildings, horseless carriages, and flying machines—the domain of the legendary Folklords.

The LEGO DC movies are always a lot of fun and completely ridiculous in the best possible way. A couple of years ago, I reviewed Aquaman: Rage of Atlantis, which gave us an undersea adventure that was funny and strange. Now, Shazam: Magic and Monsters gives us more of that same brand of off-beat LEGO humor, and the film doesn’t disappoint. There’s action, there’s adventure, there’s comedy, and the Blu-ray comes with a free LEGO figure. It’s really hard to go wrong with that.

The film, NoHo, came out in 1995, one year after Clerks. The two are very similar: ultra-low budget films about Gen X slackers, meandering their way through life while having amusing conversations. In fact, I wouldn’t be at all surprised if this film is a direct result of writer/director/star David Schrader watching Clerks and saying, “Hey, I bet I could do that!” Not that that’s necessarily a bad thing.

Madeleine Holly-Rosing’s short story, “Here Abide Monsters,” was originally published in the Steampunk anthology, Some Time Later, which I had the pleasure of reviewing a few years ago. Set in the world of Holly-Rosing’s Boston Metaphysical Society, it tells the story of Duncan, a young Irish lad in pre-Civil War United States, attempting to lead Mae, an escaped slave, to freedom and safety.

This comic kind of sneaks up on you. It can turn on a dime from “What’s going on?” to “What happens next?” Of course, it also switches back to “What’s going on?” just as easily. It’s not an easy journey, but it does make for a pretty intense ride.

‘Abe:’ Movie Review

When I first heard about this movie, I thought I had a pretty good idea of what it would be like: a young, talented chef saves himself, his family, and possibly the world, through the Power of Food™. That’s not what this film is. Instead, it’s something a good deal deeper, and a good deal more real.

Buddy the unicorn lives in Glow, one of six magical realms throughout the galaxy, and the seat of power for them all. Looked down on by the other unicorns because of the little stump where his horn should be, Buddy longs to prove himself and be considered worthy.

In Russia in December of 1916, a mysterious, hooded time traveler named Maya shows up out of the blue to assassinate Grigori Rasputin. Then, in 1944, Virginia Hall, a spy codenamed Artemis, assassinates a prominent Nazi for the Allied troops in Vichy, France. What will happen when these two women cross paths?

I have always thought that tardigrades would make great sci-fi creatures. They’re the perfect combination of freaky and adorable. If you don’t know what a tardigrade is, they’re microscopic creatures that look a bit like bears, a bit like pigs, but mostly nothing like anything else you’ve seen before. They can survive in virtually any conditions, including the vacuum of space, and are functionally immortal.

Amy’s life in Kokomo is coming apart. David and Cassie, her first friends when she came to Earth, have broken up. Will she need to choose between them? On top of that, Oliver, the strange, white-haired boy who hides his personality’s flavor, doesn’t seem to want to talk to her. And on top of everything else, Amy is failing history class. Everything is happening at once, and it may be too much for her to handle.

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