Steven W. Alloway, Fanbase Press Contributor

Steven W. Alloway, Fanbase Press Contributor

Cosmic Force is a comic series by Allen Carter about a group of superheroes who got caught in a meteor shower in Hawaii and now have superpowers. The Before Times is a series of Cosmic Force prequel comics which tell the origin stories of each of the characters. If you haven’t read the series, this might not be the best place to start - which is not to say it’s not still an entertaining story.

This graphic novel plays just like a Peanuts television special. It doesn’t just have the Peanuts style, though that’s certainly part of it. It also has the familiar rhythm of a Peanuts special—a rhythm I can’t really explain, but if you’ve seen a Peanuts special or two and read this graphic novel, you’ll see what I mean.

In 1901, Jules Verne wrote a novel called The Lighthouse at the End of the World about a secluded lighthouse and its keepers in the middle of nowhere, and the pirates who attack it. Now, David Hine and Brian Haberlin have adapted that novel into a sci-fi comic that includes spaceships, wormholes, androids… and, of course, pirates. I haven’t read the novel, so I don’t know how faithful the comic is to the source material, but it does manage to be interesting enough in its own right.

The first issue of Radiant Black was split about evenly between superhero action and conversations about main character Nathan’s life, as he struggles with a failed writing career and crippling credit card debt. In this issue, the focus is much more on using powers and chasing bad guys, but there is still a fair amount of “real life” that creeps in.

Love is in the air at Fanbase Press! In this magical month of romance and enchantment, the Fanbase Press Staff and Contributors decided to stop and smell the roses. Throughout the week of Valentine’s Day, members of the Fanbase Press crew will be sharing their personal love letters to the areas of geekdom they adore the most.

Radiant Black almost feels like two different stories stuck together. Most superhero stories have a juxtaposition between ordinary life and the fantastical world of powers and suits, but I’ve never come across one where that juxtaposition was so jarring. That’s not a bad thing or a good thing. It’s an interesting stylistic choice. It’s still just the first issue, so we’ll see how the choice plays out as the story progresses.

Making an animated Kung Fu movie is a difficult proposition. Martial arts sequences aren’t necessarily as impressive when the participants are drawn instead of real. Therefore, the filmmakers really have to work hard to make sure that those scenes are still compelling, and the film as a whole still keeps the audience engaged. I’m happy to report that Batman: Soul of the Dragon succeeds on that front in spades.

Adventureman gives a modern perspective to the adventure stories that were popular in the pulp novels of the ‘20s, the film serials of the ‘30s, and the radio dramas of the ‘40s. There are colorful characters, dastardly villains, and a whole world of possibilities. In short, it’s the sort of comic that’s right up my alley.

‘Shedding:’ Movie Review

Shedding is a strange, surreal film that is beautifully shot. I’m still not entirely sure what to think about it, but I definitely enjoyed it.

Christopher Sebela is a master at crafting intricate, fascinating worlds that grab your attention from the very beginning. A few years ago, I had the pleasure of reviewing Welcome Back, a series which explored forbidden love in a world of reincarnation and assassination. Now, with Pantomime, he’s exploring the bonds of chosen family set against the background of daring and elaborate heists—and that’s only the beginning of what this comic has to offer.

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