Steven W. Alloway, Fanbase Press Contributor

Steven W. Alloway, Fanbase Press Contributor

In a world of superpowers, realistically, not everyone would take up the mantle of a hero or a villain. A lot of them would probably go into sports. That’s the concept explored by SFC Comics, and the titles they release, like Kasai.

What if you lived in an ideal world? What if the problems that plague our current world, like disease and climate change, were conquered long before you were born, and everything is perfect now. Would you sit back and relax in this perfect world? Or would you want more?

As much as I love superheroes, my main fascination has always been with the supervillains. So, it probably goes without saying that I’m really enjoying this comic. But this is a review, so I guess I need to say it anyway: This comic is a lot of fun.

While Hollywood only just released its LEGO Batman movie in 2017, DC made a direct-to-DVD LEGO Batman movie in 2013 and has been releasing LEGO Justice League films ever since. And while Hollywood’s live-action blockbuster Aquaman movie doesn’t come out until late December, DC has a LEGO Aquaman movie for you right now. Though I haven’t seen the live-action movie yet, I think I can guarantee that you will laugh much harder at this one than at the one with Jason Momoa.

Back in 2014, I reviewed a bizarre spy thriller called The Spartak Trigger which I described as, “a good book disguised as a bad book.” Immediately after submitting that review, it occurred to me that that description might not sound as complimentary as I intended it, and I worried that it could be taken the wrong way; however, apparently, the author liked it, because he still tweets that line out as a pull quote every now and then.

There are certain words and phrases that will always sell me on a story, no matter what it’s about. One of them is Nikola Tesla. So, when I saw that Tesla was to be a major character in this comic, I was eager to review it. The fact that it comes from Madeleine Holly-Rosing, creative mind behind the wildly entertaining Boston Metaphysical Society series, was just icing on the cake.

Next year will be the 50th anniversary of the first Moon landing. We’ve all seen the historic moment: Neil Armstrong stepping off the ladder, taking a few bounds, and saying, “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.” But how did they get there? Who were those brave men who took that mission, and what was the process that took them from the Kennedy Space Center to the Moon and back?

This simple, rather unassuming comic explores a lot of fascinating sci-fi concepts that tend not to get a lot of attention in mainstream pop culture. On the surface, it’s about space travel and (in a manner of speaking) time travel, but when you actually read the comic, it’s about so much more than that.

This may be the second volume in a larger story, but it’s important to note that Infinite Loop: Nothing But the Truth is mostly standalone. If you haven’t read the first volume, you won’t be lost trying to keep up. Most of the important information is explained quickly and clearly in the first few pages. Though, of course, the first volume is very good, too, and I highly recommend you check it out, as well.

To say that this comic is a modern retelling of the Greek myth of Persephone doesn’t really do it justice. That’s what it is at its core, but the story ends up being so much more than that. With this comic, writer Loïc Locatelli Kournwsky has created an entire world, rooted in Greek myths, but also very much its own entity—and fascinating to read.

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