Steven W. Alloway, Fanbase Press Contributor

Steven W. Alloway, Fanbase Press Contributor

It’s finally time for Future to have her baby. With all she’s been through leading up to this moment, it’s a safe bet that a simple, straightforward delivery is too much to hope for. Now, Letme Live, the sentient plant that Future risked everything to save, will have to risk everything to save both Future and her unborn child.

A hybrid between a novel and a comic, this quirky tale has everything you’d want from a children’s medieval adventure story. It has fearsome monsters, epic quests, sorcery and magic, and more, all bound together with a self-aware, self-referential eye and a generous dose of humor.

Heist stories are nearly always fun. Time travel stories are always fun, too. Odd couple buddy comedies can be hit or miss, but when they’re done right, they are, again, a lot of fun. Smooth Criminals takes one part heist story, one part time travel story, and one part well-executed odd couple buddy comedy, and rolls them up into one delightfully odd, charmingly awkward package. I’m really liking this comic.

One of the things I’m loving about Lightstep is that each issue paints a vivid picture of a different society and the people who live and function in it. The first issue featured a people obsessed with racial purity, to the point of eugenics and genocide. The second issue depicted warring space pirates. This issue shows us a devoutly religious planet, whose people are about to witness the culmination of centuries of belief.

The world built by LaGuardia over these first two issues has been rich and fascinating, and I feel like we’re only just scratching the surface. Not only are there a plethora of different aliens from all around the universe, there are also a number of different aspects to the future society in which these characters live which I’d love to explore in depth.

The first issue of Lightstep was fascinating but also a little off-putting in its depiction of a supposed Master Race built around eugenics and genocide. They were the villains of the story, of course, but even so, it was disconcerting to spend so much time and detail introducing them. This issue, on the other hand, is just as fascinating but also a whole lot more fun. This issue gives us space radio pirates.

The ‘90s were a simpler time, when the general public still wasn’t 100% sure what computers were capable of, and all that a movie character had to say was, “I’m a hacker,” and suddenly they were the most powerful person on the planet. The '90s gave us movies like Hackers, wherein cracking a computer was essentially a video game, and The Matrix, wherein hacking literally gave you superpowers.

What happens when you build your society on the words and actions of a genocidal madman? How do lifestyles and attitudes evolve after generations of fostering that mindset? Lightstep shows us some of the terrifying possibilities.

I was a little wary of this comic at first. On the one hand, I’m a massive fan of Dr. Horrible. (I even wrote a geeky love letter to him last year.) On the other hand, a comic where Dr. Horrible and Captain Hammer are suddenly best friends sounded like it could easily fall into the realm of weird and gimmicky.

I wish I had had this book to read when I was a kid. As a child of eight or so, I would have, if you’ll pardon the expression, eaten Time Sandwich right up. Reading it as an adult, I still ate it right up. If you know me at all, you’ll know that this kind of broad sci-fi/fantasy is the sort of thing I live for. It’s time travel at its finest.

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