Steven W. Alloway, Fanbase Press Contributor

Steven W. Alloway, Fanbase Press Contributor

 

Way Down in Chinatown stillWay Down in Chinatown is bizarre and often incomprehensible. Sometimes shrill and discordant, sometimes uncomfortable, and sometimes discombobulating. These aren’t criticisms of the film, merely observations. It was designed to be all of these things, and quite a bit more.

 

Skyward 1At its core, Skyward is filled with that childlike sense of adventure that makes a good children’s fantasy story. The story itself is somewhat familiar, at least in Issue #1, mapping out what appears to be the beginning of the classic hero’s journey. But, though the story is simple, there’s a lot of potential in it for great things.

 

Strange Attractors coverStrange Attractors is a unique brand of science fiction. It’s not about starships or time machines or genetic experiments. Instead, it’s about the advanced mathematical equations that can find patterns in the complex systems that govern the chaos of our world. Sound boring? Not at all. The story doesn’t delve into any great detail about what these equations are, any more than Back to the Future delves into how the flux capacitor works. Instead, it shows us characters who are able to use these equations to shape reality and predict and influence the world around them.

 

Danger Girl Trinity 2What makes the Danger Girl: Trinity series so much fun is that it doesn’t take itself too seriously. It’s total sensationalism—full of explosions and scantily clad women—and it owns that fact. The situations are often over the top and full of adrenaline, but behind the epic car chases and gun battles (sometimes happening simultaneously) is just a touch of silliness that makes it truly fun.

 

automotiveAutomotive, playing Saturday evening at Los Angeles’ “Dances With Films” festival, is an ambitious project. It’s a neo-noir, shot entirely in and from the protagonist’s 1964 Mercury muscle car. That alone is enough to make the film worth a look. But, there’s more to Automotive than that. Writer/director Tom Glynn has crafted a smart, gripping thriller that’s satisfying and fun.

 

automotiveAutomotive, playing Saturday evening at Los Angeles’ “Dances With Films” festival, is an ambitious project. It’s a neo-noir, shot entirely in and from the protagonist’s 1964 Mercury muscle car. That alone is enough to make the film worth a look. But, there’s more to Automotive than that. Writer/director Tom Glynn has crafted a smart, gripping thriller that’s satisfying and fun.

 

Danger Girl Trinity 2What makes the Danger Girl: Trinity series so much fun is that it doesn’t take itself too seriously. It’s total sensationalism—full of explosions and scantily clad women—and it owns that fact. The situations are often over the top and full of adrenaline, but behind the epic car chases and gun battles (sometimes happening simultaneously) is just a touch of silliness that makes it truly fun.

 

Strange Attractors coverStrange Attractors is a unique brand of science fiction. It’s not about starships or time machines or genetic experiments. Instead, it’s about the advanced mathematical equations that can find patterns in the complex systems that govern the chaos of our world. Sound boring? Not at all. The story doesn’t delve into any great detail about what these equations are, any more than Back to the Future delves into how the flux capacitor works. Instead, it shows us characters who are able to use these equations to shape reality and predict and influence the world around them.

 

Skyward 1At its core, Skyward is filled with that childlike sense of adventure that makes a good children’s fantasy story. The story itself is somewhat familiar, at least in Issue #1, mapping out what appears to be the beginning of the classic hero’s journey. But, though the story is simple, there’s a lot of potential in it for great things.

 

Way Down in Chinatown stillWay Down in Chinatown is bizarre and often incomprehensible. Sometimes shrill and discordant, sometimes uncomfortable, and sometimes discombobulating. These aren’t criticisms of the film, merely observations. It was designed to be all of these things, and quite a bit more.

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