Russ Pirozek, Fanbase Press Contributor

Russ Pirozek, Fanbase Press Contributor

Dark Horse Comics is well known for its interesting catalog of titles. While their catalog often contains licensed comics, they also take chances on epic, new creator-owned series, including She Could Fly, a series by Christopher Cantwell, co-creator of the hit show, Halt and Catch Fire.

Rick and Morty is a strange franchise, known for being outlandish, kind of gross, and just a bizarre mix of science, humor, and some truly outrageous visuals. The comics for the franchise have been no different, keeping the same sense of personality and ridiculousness that the show is known for, without the tricky animation budgets and writing delays.

The home stretch is upon us, as we are now at the final four issues of this series. It's been a strange, intense ride over five years of god-based insanity, ridiculous specials, more musical references and/or puns than any one series should have, and so much beautiful art. Over the past forty issues, we've seen the gods of the last few generations die, betray each other, die some more, kill each other and a lot of other people, come back to life, and die some more. In between all of this dying and resurrection has been a mystical soap opera of backstabbing, love, loss, and some really crazy things. That being said, it's all been glorious, and this issue is no exception.

The return of the Wyld Stallyns has finally arrived, and, this time, the most popular duo in all of music are headed on an incredible intergalactic adventure in a way that only these two could. Years after their most excellent adventure and bogus journey, Bill & Ted, with their families in hand, have finally become what they always knew they could: the most influential band in all of time and space.

It's The Truman Show meets Pacific Rim in the most recent re-release of Rick Remender and Eric Nguyen's Gigantic, the story of a planet that is just now discovering that they aren't just being watched, but their whole lives were created as a form of entertainment.

I've written about this series for a long time, and as it has progressed, it has gone from a weird, silly series about gods, music, and the concept of forced family to, well, a weird, silly series about gods, musick and the concept of forced family. While the major themes of the series have stayed strong, the characters and the story have moved in such amazing ways that it has become yet another opus in the careers of Kieron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie. Together, these two creators have brought some incredible works to life with their influential run on Marvel's New Avengers and their masterpiece, Phonogram.

In his debut creator-owned work, writer Ryan Cady wanted to explore the concept of rebuilding after the world ends.  With that concepet, we get Infinite Dark, a new science fiction/horror series from Image Comics and Top Cow Productions. Exploring how the human race moves on and rebuilds after the entire universe goes dark, this series is equal parts unsettling and overwhelming. The entire concept of the heat death of the universe is something deeply unnerving, and seeing what happens to those who are still alive is, somehow, even more horrific.

Image Comics publishes some very interesting and weird titles, a pattern that has been a great trend for the company overall. With their dedication to allowing creators to really make the things they want to make, some incredible titles are released. One of those interesting and very weird titles is the new and best-named comic book series, Murder Falcon, which mixes action, humor, and a whole lot of metal.

As we gear up for the last arc of The Wicked + The Divine, we get one more of these interesting and illuminating one-shots featuring the gods we've come to know and love during one of their previous runs in the world. This time, we go to 1373 during the time of the Black Plague. While we don't see too many of the gods we've met before, but we do get a look at a long-gone member of the Pantheon, our beloved Lucifer.

It's the end of the “Mothering Invention” arc, and with its end, the finale to this series is brought forward. As we rocket towards what will be the end of the series, we see the fates of many of the gods hang in the balance as the final plan of Minerva comes into play. With her and Woden's machinations lining up the way they'd planned, it is up to the rest of them to put an end to it, if they can. With Persephone's life in shambles and the rest of the gods dead, scattered, or captured, things are looking bleak as we hit the end of the line of this part of the series.

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