Phillip Kelly, Fanbase Press Contributor

Phillip Kelly, Fanbase Press Contributor

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein was about the ambition of science, about playing god, and about how humans are more monsters than the monsters they create. These themes have resided comfortably in fiction ever since, from Blade Runner to just about every zombie story ever written. Mike Mignola’s Hellboy has always been about fitting in, the monsters we have within us, and the internal and external fight against those monsters. Frankenstein Undone is the border between these two worlds, the crossing of these themes, and a conversation between creators and it fits like a glove. #StoriesMatter because they allow us to feed off previous stories and reflect on what matters to us in new stories.

The team of Evan Dorkin and Veronica and Andy Fish are spinning a tale with multiple threads that inevitably will continue after next issue’s conclusion. There are just too many things at play, and they are all wonderful. I would hate to see any of them get short shrift.

Every week, Fanbase Press Contributor Phillip Kelly plays and reviews a handful of brand new independent video games, all costing no more than $20. Why?  There are a lot of indie games out there, and if he can help you, curious reader, to parse through the selection with even a little more knowledge, then, by god, he’ll die content.

Every week, Fanbase Press Contributor Phillip Kelly plays and reviews a handful of brand new independent video games, all costing no more than $20. Why?  There are a lot of indie games out there, and if he can help you, curious reader, to parse through the selection with even a little more knowledge, then, by god, he’ll die content.

Every week, Fanbase Press Contributor Phillip Kelly plays and reviews a handful of brand new independent video games, all costing no more than $20. Why?  There are a lot of indie games out there, and if he can help you, curious reader, to parse through the selection with even a little more knowledge, then, by god, he’ll die content.

Every week, Fanbase Press Contributor Phillip Kelly will take some time to play two brand-spanking-new or recent indie video game releases, all within an affordable range of $15 or less. Why? There are a lot of indie games out there, and if he can help you, curious reader, to parse through the selection, then by god, he’ll die content.

In thinking about the paths that our heroes take in the Star Wars saga - for the original trilogy, that of Luke Skywalker, and for the most recent trilogy, the tale of Rey (now Skywalker) - my mind is awash with questions and conflicts. As a child, seeing Luke turn Vader in the end was a heroic action. He fought against the dark side of the Force to save his father from a death that would have disconnected him with all living things.

The first images that come to mind when I think of H.R. Giger aren’t necessarily of the Xenomorph. The first images are of human frames (mostly female) meshed with robots and alien lifeforms, penetrating each other in all sort of ways. Giger’s Biomechanics is haunting, beautiful, and terrifying.  Thanks to the popularity of the Alien series, these images are scrawled into my brain.

I was not expecting that. I started reading this first issue of Spy Island really having no idea what to expect, but I was not expecting that. And that, folks, that was amazing. The synopsis is in the title. We’re on an island in the Bermuda Triangle, and there are spies, but also - and hold onto your hats - because I’m not going to give away what else is on this island. Why would I ruin that?

Many of the Life Drawn graphic novels from Humanoids have a similar story device to help push the action forward, that of the first-person narrator. We get a firsthand retelling of (sometimes) real-life emotional turmoil, and, because of that, some of the books can start off feeling like an echo of something you’ve already read. This can be both welcoming, like returning to something you love, and at the same time toy ever so slightly with your patience, as you want the book to open new doorways into different lives.

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