Phillip Kelly, Fanbase Press Contributor

Phillip Kelly, Fanbase Press Contributor

“They took everything.” A statement uttered by a character in the town of Holland, Michigan, your average, middle-American town where a newly opened store called Everything is taking its toll on everyone… by giving everyone exactly what they think that want. Consumerism and, as an extension, unfettered capitalism are the villains in this new, genre-bending sci-fi comic book series by Christopher Cantwell and I.N.J. Culbard.

Harrow County was one of the first regular series I followed as a reviewer for Fanbase Press. It was wonderful - a dark, mysterious, character-driven Southern Gothic story. Cullen Bunn and Tyler Crook created not just a world for their characters to inhabit, but a mythology that stood up next to the likes of Mike Mignola’s Hellboy or Neil Gaiman’s Sandman. It was rich, full of dramatic textures and haunting storylines.

In the world of Black Hammer, Jeff Lemire shows us what a vigilante would look like in the form of Skulldigger.

I’ve written 18 reviews now following each issue of Gideon Falls, and for me to say anything about the story at this point would be to ruin the experience of everything I’ve gone through. The emotional, mind-bending, upending nature of this series leaves me wide-eyed and out of breath at the end of every issue.

Matt Kindt must sit in his office and wonder, “What’s the last thing that readers would expect to happen at the end of this issue? I’ll do that.” And, he does. And, it is. It never feels inorganic; it never feels like a cheat.

Are you happy? Go to Everything, where you can buy happiness. A superstore in which, if you’re not happy, you may be gotten rid of… permanently.

With every issue of this series, David Rubin must get the script and think to himself, “Time to go crazy,” because that’s what he does with the art of Ether. Some issues more so than others, and this is one of them - from the layout, to the creatures we’re introduced to, to the wonderful, weird world we find ourselves in along with Boone Dias. I'm curious if Matt Kindt repeatedly places two words throughout his script: go crazy.

Issue three of Something Is Killing the Children revolves around a few key moments, two of which are entirely dialogue driven. These scenes are some of the best I’ve seen written in some time. Any exposition is natural, the pacing is fluid, and the tension is built through character conflict. James Tynion IV is a fantastic writer, and he’s taking the time to let this story breathe.

The previous issue of The Weatherman had an incredibly amazing cliffhanger, and I have to be honest that I was just a little bit disappointed with where the story went in the subsequent issue - as if a different path could have changed everything for everyone involved. But, if I’m to be honest with myself once again, LeHeup's chosen direction makes more sense with who the characters are, and it’s a really fun issue.

I had the absolute pleasure of reading issues 7 and 8 of Ronin Island back to back, and it was awesome. When issue 7 came to an end, I verbally projected my joy with a rousing whoop (or about as close as someone can) and was really thrilled that issue 8 was waiting there for me.

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