Phillip Kelly, Fanbase Press Contributor

Phillip Kelly, Fanbase Press Contributor

The fourth and final chapter in the first story arc of Tales from Harrow County is haunting and beautiful.

What would it be like to step into a hard-boiled Dali painting? That’s the question that King of Nowhere asks. That’s the situation that Denis, our dreamer, finds himself in.

Tomorrow deals with a premise I’ve seen tackled a few times recently, where a super virus within a computer begins to affect those in the real world with a weird strain of illness. It’s a potent allegory to take on: how technology and the endless landscapes of social media affect who we are as people. Peter Milligan’s take on the premise differs in two very different ways.

With Folklords #4, Matt Kindt continues to delve into the post-modern cerebral landscape of why #StoriesMatter. Also, what the heck are stories anyway? What happens if we don't know whether we're in a story? Who controls our stories? Are our stories based on the privilege of the knowledge that has been given to us? How would our stories change if we knew more? And in turn, I ask, how have those stories changed me and affected who I am? Does Kindt ask all of these question in this one single issue? No! But as a reader (and reviewer), I’m having an active conversation with the artist as I read their work, and these are the questions that spring to my mind when I read this issue, inspired by the adventure our hero finds himself in.

Where do I even begin? I had fallen behind on reading the volumes of Berserk, so, in the last week, I read half of 2, all of 3, quickly followed by all of 4. I have been utterly transfixed.

The incredible dynamic of this artistic team is working at full force with their series, Manor Black. I was a really big fan of Bunn and Crook’s Harrow County and of Bunn and Hurtt’s The Damned. The three together make a really fantastic team.

Hoo-wee! I cackled openly and often while reading the first issue of Matt Kindt and Wilfredo Torres’s new series, Bang! Think James Bond with a Philip K. Dick flare, both in quite the literal sense.

I love a good Hellboy tale more than almost anything else. Like Zatoichi: The Blind Swordsman or Lone Wolf and Cub, his stories are a comforting place to return to.

In this issue, Bernice sets out with her goblin friend to find the source of the music that’s bringing the dead back to life in Harrow County. It’s World War II, and many of the dead are soldiers who are bringing comfort to the families upon their return; however, there are also dark forces coming back and taking the living with them.

I really enjoyed the first volume of Blackwood, a sort of Harry Potter-like story for college-age kids dealing with occult and Cthulu-like baddies. It turned out the headmaster was one of these baddies and had put a curse on the new kids that their fates would perish with the school. One of those kids did. Of course, there was another villain, and it became a dark story of failed love in the end. It was fun.

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