Angie Martin, Fanbase Press Guest Contributor

Angie Martin, Fanbase Press Guest Contributor

The Evil Within fans are having a great year. First, it was announced that we’ll finally see a second title in the ever-popular video game series. Then, they received an intermediary gift in the form of a two-issue comic book series to bridge the gap between games #1 and #2. As a follow-up to the first issue, The Evil Within: The Interlude #2 (Titan Comics) satisfies the fan in every possible way and prepares them for their return to STEM.

Justice League: The Flashpoint Paradox is quite possibly one of the greatest DC animated films ever created. So, when it was announced that The Flash television series (CW) would explore the concept in Season 3, a resounding cheer echoed from DC fans everywhere. Just before they had that collective, “Oh, crap, what now?” tension creep into their brains.

In 2014, The Evil Within video game was released to gamers who didn’t know what to expect. Touted as one of the scariest games since Silent Hill and the original Resident Evil games, The Evil Within shattered the horror barriers with an acid trip-like journey through a mind-bending world filled with creatures that created more than their fair share of nightmares. With the highly anticipated upcoming release of The Evil Within 2 on October 13, 2017, a comic series has never been better timed. But, with this, The Evil Within: The Interlude #1 (Titan Comics) has its work cut out for it to try to stand up to one of the best video games in years.

Horror comes in many forms, but great horror sticks with you long after you’ve finished, haunting both waking hours as well as dreams, if you’re lucky. The Eyrie is a wonderful addition to the horror world, with stark images of black-and-white creatures that one definitely never wants to meet.

One of the things in this world that not enough people talk about is mental illness. It’s the “hush-hush” conversation, unless it’s altogether avoided. The stigma that mental illness carries with it is so great, it seems that time has not yet been able to put much of a dent in the assumptions and prejudices associated with those suffering from one or more of them.

Ghost Island #1: The Invitation (created and written by Joseph Oliveira) is a supernatural thriller about a wealthy man continuing his father’s work in opening an island filled with imprisoned ghosts. The concept takes Jurassic Park just a few steps further (in the direction of Thir13en Ghosts), but still draws upon the familiarity of having a group of experts being called to the island to help finalize the theme park before opening.

“Hey, have you ever wondered what it would be like to kill someone?”

Cullen Bunn is indisputably the new king of horror comics. I knew that to be true while reading the Harrow County series, but he solidified his seat with The Unsound #1 (from BOOM! Studios).  I’m not sure if anyone can dethrone him, which is just fine with this horror aficionado.

One never quite knows when something will change their life. We all have those moments, whether good or bad, but sometimes the cause of the change can be quite surprising. But, a fictional television show? How could that ever impact anyone in a meaningful way? This is the topic of Family Don’t End with Blood: Cast and Fans on How Supernatural Has Changed Lives (edited by superfan Lynn S. Zubernis).

I first became aware of Christie Shinn’s intriguing artwork in Caligula Imperatore Insanum (Vol 1), where I fell in love with her ability to tell a story with her drawings. Shinn has the capability to bring emotion into her work, and that is extremely clear in A Murder of Crows: And Other Horrible Things to See.

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