L. N. Conliff, Fanbase Press Contributor

L. N. Conliff, Fanbase Press Contributor

Love is in the air at Fanbase Press! In this magical month of romance and enchantment, the Fanbase Press Staff and Contributors decided to stop and smell the roses. Throughout the week of Valentine’s Day, a few members of the Fanbase Press crew will be sharing their personal love letters to the areas of geekdom they adore the most.

Horror is a genre that needs to be broken down into more apt sub-genres to be truly understood. From the slasher to the psychological horror, it's a genre with countless deviations. But, then again, sometimes, there are stories that can be described as pure horror. There's no subset or distraction - just the creeping horror that has been with us since primordial times. That's how I'd describe Road of Bones.

I’ve really been dragging my feet on Stranger Things lately. It took me longer than I’d like to admit to get around to watching season 3, and I’ve utterly failed to keep up to date on the latest comics. I’d just about given up trying to catch up when Stranger Things: Zombie Boys caught my attention. Its small scale reminded me of the tight scope of the first season I’d originally fell in love with, and I decided to give it a chance.

I've spent a lifetime skittering along the edges of the Magic: The Gathering franchise. Just about everyone I known has carried a deck with them at one time or another, and I’ve dabbled with the lore on more than one occasion. In the past, I’ve bounced off of it because of the sheer size and complexity of that lore, but recently I’ve been doing a bit of reading up on the franchise and decided I wanted to give it another try. As luck would have it, Magic: The Gathering - Chandra seemed like the opportunity to do just that.

Hex Vet: The Flying Surgery is the second in the Hex Vet series of graphic novels released by writer/artist Sam Davies through BOOM! Studios. This time last Christmas, I reviewed Hex Vet: Witches in Training, a sturdy, little story that I happened to enjoy quite a bit. I picked up The Flying Surgery hoping that the nitpicks I had with the first story had been ironed out, and I’m happy to say they have!

A Sparrow's Roar almost passed me by. A brief opening in my schedule left me with time for one more review, and A Sparrow’s Roar called to me. I’m so happy for that little bit of happenstance, because, with December just settling in, A Sparrow’s Roar was the perfect bittersweet story to round out a rough and tough year.

In July, I received the opportunity to review the first two books in the Young Adventurer's Guide series. I've waited ever since for the chance to pick up the remaining books in the series and, as luck would have it, Dungeons & Dragons: Dungeons & Tombs recently crossed my desk.

As Halloween is fast approaching, the Fanbase Press staff and contributors decided that there was no better way to celebrate this horrifically haunting holiday than by sharing our favorite scary stories! Be they movies, TV shows, video games, novels, or any other form of entertainment, members of the Fanbase Press crew will be sharing their “scariest” stories each day leading up to Halloween. We hope that you will enjoy this sneak peek into the terrors that frighten Fanbase Press!

Bizarre, emotional, and strangely poignant. Not really the words I expected to use when talking about a video game tie-in comic, but this is where I find myself with today’s outing. Minecraft: Stories from the Overworld is a curious anthology of tales set in the Minecraft universe. Somewhat akin to Minecraft: Volume 1, which I reviewed earlier this year, Stories from the Overworld has the same feeling as its predecessor but gives different artists and writers the chance to cut their teeth on the Minecraft world.

The Twilight Zone has been cited by countless writers and directors as a major influence in television and the science fiction genre as a whole. For the past 50 years, its eerily poignant messages have remained relevant in the social and political worlds. But for its popularity, the man behind the project remains mostly a mystery. Rod Serling, a face any fan of the show could place, carefully crafted an image as an impartial observer, but who was he when the lights went off? The Twilight Man: Rod Serling and the Birth of Television seeks to shine a light on the life of television's “angry young man.”

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