L. N. Conliff, Fanbase Press Guest Contributor

L. N. Conliff, Fanbase Press Guest Contributor

If you've only been following the Steven Universe TV show and haven't delved into the comics, I have a secret for you: They're amazing. If you have no clue what Steven Universe is, then here's an extra secret: It's amazing. I've only had a few opportunities to pick up these comics in the past, but every time has been a delight. Steven Universe: Fusion Frenzy #1 was no exception.



Fantasy is one of those genres that comes in waves. Sometimes, we’re lousy with good fantasy material, and, sometimes, it’s a dearth so severe, we’re begging for even a scrap of magical realism. Throughout the past few decades, though, comic books have been putting in the legwork to produce new and interesting fantasy concepts that usually take television and film a few years to catch up on. Shades of Magic Volume 1: The Steel Prince caught my eye for this exact reason; it looked like it could be something entirely new.



If you're a frequent reader of Fanbase Press, you might remember that I reviewed the first volume of Mob Psycho 100 a few months ago. That strange manga, brought to us by the same artist responsible for the incredible One Punch Man, charmed me with its bizarre narrative and simplistic art style. Well, we're back for round two with Mob Psycho 100 Volume 2.


I was about seven years old when my brother first showed me Starcraft. This juggernaut of a game was instrumental in forming my tastes on the science fiction genre as a whole. The series is now best known for its competitive scene, but I was fascinated with the exciting and mysterious lore the game hinted at in its campaign. I, admittedly, dropped off with the series around the time of Heart of the Swarm, but Starcraft Volume 1: Scavengers, with its retro logo and cover art, reminded me of those early days playing the game on some long-forgotten PC.

With the holidays officially over and the New Year underway, I wanted to pick up something that deviated from my usual interests. I haven’t read much in the true crime genre, so I wasn’t sure what to expect when it came to Green River Killer. I was aware of the true-life events that the book is based on, but my knowledge only extended to names and a few rough details. With that in mind, I picked up the book with a bit of trepidation.



Comics, like any other media, suffer from an overdose of remakes, spinoffs, and sequels. If it isn't the juggernauts of Marvel and DC, then it's movie tie-ins, or TV tie-ins, and so on and so forth. That's why I sometimes go out of my way to pick up a comic purely because it doesn't appear to be related to any larger project. That's what motivated my decision to pick up Hex Vet: Witches in Training.

Magic! Adventure! Terror! Romance! DRAGONS! What isn't there to love about Dungeons & Dragons? For the uninitiated: Dungeons & Dragons is a tabletop roleplaying game. Basically, this means you assume the role of a character and then use dice to determine what that character does and how well it goes for them. The game is so wildly popular that it has spawned movies, games, books, and comics for decades. Which brings us to today's offering: Dungeons & Dragons: Evil at Baldur's Gate.

By now, you've probably encountered Disney’s Tsum Tsum at least once. If you haven't, they're basically a line of tiny stuffed animals that come from Japan based on Disney characters ranging from Mickey Mouse to Iron Man. Tsum Tsum have become something of a cultural phenomenon, leading to spin-off materials of all shapes and sizes, including today's comic: Disney’s Tsum Tsum Kingdom.



Whenever I'm sitting down to review a comic, I ask myself a couple of basic questions. Is this piece something new? Am I enjoying my time with it? Does the artwork complement the writing and vise versa? And, assuming the piece is some form of adaptation or spin off, how true does it stay to the source material? That last part is especially important when it comes to Disney Afternoon Giant #1.

Mob Psycho 100: Volume 1 had me hooked from the get go. It was originally written by ONE, the writer/artist responsible for the absolutely fantastic One Punch Man. On top of that, Mob Psycho 100 sells itself on the premise of a character with overwhelming psychic abilities which sounded reminiscent of the landmark Japanese film, Akira. Basically, going into Mob Psycho 100: Volume 1, I had every reason to be excited.

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