Jeremy Schmidt, Fanbase Press Contributor

Jeremy Schmidt, Fanbase Press Contributor

Eugenic is presented in three separate horror stories told across time, starting with the literal end of the human race as we know it. The book is chock-full of hot takes that range from Twilight Zone-esque to full-tilt campiness. It is scary. It is brutal. There are concepts and images in Eugenic that will make your hair stand straight up and excuse itself from your head. Most of the moments in the book feel earned, though some of them feel a bit scattered; however, this is the kind of comic book we need - one that has something to say.

The post-apocalypse has never looked so fabulous. Ales Kot, Tradd Moore, and Heather Moore present The New World, a romp-ish, buckwild love story set before the backdrop of post-second-Civil War America. You can think of it as a modern retelling of Romeo & Juliet with about 500% more lasers and visors. The vibe of the story is very '90s hacker suspense thriller, and the art direction is very Dr. Seuss. It’s confusing, fun, and frantic with a lot of risky ideas.

The Peanuts gang are some of the most beloved characters ever written. They proved themselves iconic by maintaining a run of syndicated Sunday morning comic strips that lasted from 1950 to 2000. Charles Schulz is a brilliant author, and BOOM! Studios has collected a handful of his works - beautifully preserved and carefully curated. This is the tenth volume in the series, each one as good as the last, and all of them just as philosophically existential. 




Dark Horse has released a brand new series titled Beasts of Burden: Wise Dogs and Eldritch Men. As somewhat of a Lovecraft fan, I read the word “Eldritch” and yelled “yippee!” Are you meaning to tell me there's a chance that this series will feature themes and concepts inspired by the works H.P. Lovecraft? Well, after reading the very first issue, I can confidently report that the answer is...maybe?

Christopher Sebela has modernized the “on the lam” genre with Crowded, the latest book by Image Comics. In a world where technology has completely blanketed the socio-economic landscape, a young girl is being pursued by a willing mob of heavily armed regular folk who are all crowdfunded to kill her. The book is hot, heavy, and full of bloodshed. The characters are brutal and sassy. Crowded makes no apologies for its devout roughness and is better for it.

After reading VS, I can make a really strong case that it is an allegory for the pitfalls of social media; however, you might read VS and pull a completely different meaning from it. This is what takes the first volume arc of VS from fun-for-some to fun-for-everyone.

Junior Braves of the Apocalypse is every doomsday prepper's fantasy come to glorious, undead life. Volume 1 collects the first six zombie-filled issues of the series. The book is fast paced. The action comes out of the box with the suspense nob turned all the way up. It is around 220 pages of horrifying fun that ends with a swift kick to your cold, black heart.

Outpost Zero #2 immediately picks up where the events of the double-sized introductory issue left off. In our first issue, we get a fantastic sense of the environment our characters get to play in. There is a wonderful magnitude to the dystopia of this particular future tale, and the characters are written in a carefully balanced way. Now that the stage has been set for our story, issue #2 begins to unravel the mysterious death of a main character while illustrating what Outpost Zero will ultimately be about.

The action pieces in Sword Daughter are so profoundly good that you almost forget it is the subtle details of this story that make it such a masterpiece. Brian Wood continues to surprise me with his ability to craft an ornate tapestry of complicated emotion told in such a concise way. Not a moment is wasted, and every panel counts. This is a grand reminder that a simple story can be just as affecting, if not more, than a complicated one.

If you think a cross-country roadtrip with your relatives sounds like a nightmare, just be grateful your relatives are not the anthropomorphised animal mutants Bebop and Rocksteady. After reading up on their mayhemic hijinks, you will likely never complain about roadtripping ever again. TMNT: Bebop & Rocksteady Hit the Road takes two ancillary characters from the Turtleverse (I'm trying to make this a thing.) and milks them for all of their ballistic glory. The book abounds with bullet-filled fun with enough carnage to spare.

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