Barbra Dillon, Fanbase Press Editor-in-Chief

Barbra Dillon, Fanbase Press Editor-in-Chief

Favorite BookMockingjay
Favorite Food
:  In-N-Out Burger
Favorite Heroine
:  Katniss Everdeen

The following is an interview with actor Gino Pesi, who co-stars in the upcoming film, Battle: Los Angeles, with stars Aaron Eckhart, Michelle Rodriguez, and Bridget Moynahan.   A few of Pesi’s recent credits include the films Takers and SWAT: Fire Fight, as well as TV appearances in NCIS, CSI: NY, Chuck, Cold Case, and What I like About You.  Pesi shared his thoughts with Fanboy Comics Managing Editor Barbra Dillon on his Battle: Los Angeles character, acting with CGI, and how Battle: Los Angeles’ aliens compare with other movie extraterrestrials.

This interview was conducted on Tuesday, February 22, 2011.

 

Over the past seven years, writer Robert Kirkman (Battle Pope, Invincible) has found quite a literary and theatrical phenomenon with his series, The Walking Dead. The story follows a band of unlikely heroes in their daily trials and tribulations, given their extraordinary circumstances in a world devastated by a zombie apocalypse. In 2010, AMC released The Walking Dead as a television series starring actors Jon Bernthal (Shane), Andrew Lincoln (Rick), and Sarah Wayne Callies (Lori), which garnered such a positive response that the network ordered an extended, 13-episode second season.

For fans of the original comic book, AMC’s show breathed new life into their beloved series and also offered the chance to invite new fans to the WD fold. The television show has launched the zombified story into cult status, helped by the AMC brand and its recent history of successful shows (Mad Men, Breaking Bad).

The following is an interview with actor Jon Bernthal, who shared his thoughts with Fanboy Comics Managing Editor Barbra Dillon on the future of his character, his own zombie apocalypse contingency plan, and more about Season 2. (Special thanks to David Bliss for his assistance in securing this interview with Mr. Bernthal!)

This interview was conducted on Thursday, January 13, 2011.

 

I recently read The Hunger Games trilogy by Suzanne Collins, and I must encourage anyone who hasn’t already read the books to get out and buy a copy today!  This is one of the most engrossing series that I have ever read; you will not be disappointed if you give the series a chance. For those unfamiliar with the series, the plot is based in a post-apocalyptic world where the teenaged children of poor citizens are forced by the aristocracy to battle to the death in an annual, televised program called the Hunger Games. 

On a lark, I decided to cast the main characters from the first book of the series.  For those who haven’t been keeping track of The Fanboy Scoop, a HG movie is already in the works, so I wanted to get a jump on casting before Hollywood ruined another project.  I will say that this cast is not ideal, given that the number of talented child actors now-a-days is scant.  Had this been cast ten years ago, this movie might have been epic!  Alas, I will work with what I must…

Zorba the Greek, a novel by Nikos Kazantzakis, enlightened the Western world with an exotic interpretation of premodern Greece, illustrating the country’s old-fashioned ideologies and cruel forms of justice through their rough interpretations of the law and moral code.  By focusing on the unforgiving, patriarchal hierarchies of the peasants, Kazantzakis examined the society’s ideologies, strict religious guidelines, and overall way of life.  Through this study, one of the novel’s themes, the application of the spirit of the law versus the letter of the law, clearly presented itself in the novel’s horrifying death scene of the “widow.”  While Kazantzakis’ novel was not written to justify these actions, his description of the people and ideals of Greece successfully managed to educate the reader of their reasoning behind taking matters into their own hands.

 

As portrayed in the novel, premodern Greek society was much like that of ancient Greece, where men ruled over the family with an iron fist, and women served no other purpose than that of domestic creature, catering to the every whim of their husband.  The common view historically was that women were inferior, sexually dangerous, and vulnerable.  When described by Plato, “...the morals of women were ill reputed throughout Greece” (Jaeger 243).  In fact, women without husbands were viewed as worthless and shameful in the eyes of the entire community, including both men and women alike.  As was the case in Zorba the Greek, a widow in the village refused to remarry and was then scorned by the men that wanted her and the women that wanted to be her.  In describing the widow, a villager commented, “She’s as you might say, the mistress of the whole village: you put out the light and you imagine it’s not the wife you take in your arms, but the widow” (Kazantzakis 97).

Hello, my name is Barbra, and I am in love with a geek.  

Star Wars, Firefly, Halo, Buffy, Preacher, Alien, Battlestar Galactica - these are all staples in my life, all of which have seeped into my movie/TV viewing schedule, my everyday conversations, and even my apartment decor.  Being in a relationship with a geek has expanded my artistic tastes and allowed me to be a part of a larger community, but, most importantly, it has provided me with the chance to connect with someone who holds these and other areas of fandom near and dear to his heart.  For the throngs of men and women who may be longing for similar relationship bliss this Valentine’s Day, I submit to you the following suggestions for finding love with a geek (or coming to terms with your geek-tastic significant other).  

SPOILERS

“I hope to show you reflections of your friends, your neighbors, your families, and yourselves, and what their reactions are to the extreme situations on this book.”  
- Robert Kirkman



Over the past seven years, writer Robert Kirkman (Battle Pope, Invincible) has found quite a literary and theatrical phenomenon with his series, The Walking Dead.  The story follows a band of unlikely heroes in their daily trials and tribulations, given their extraordinary circumstances in a world devastated by a zombie apocalypse.  Initiated as a graphic novel series in 2003, the books were met with rave reviews from critics and fans alike, most notably with its receipt of the Eisner Award in 2010 for Best Continuing Series.  In 2010, AMC released The Walking Dead as a television series, which garnered such a positive response that the network ordered an extended, 13-episode second season.

For most fans of geek culture, San Diego Comic-Con is a yearly event that is not to be missed.  Fans travel far and wide to attend the four-day convention, which has come to encompass all things pop culture: movies, television, video games, sci-fi, toys, manga, horror, and comic books.  Initiated in 1970 to celebrate the comic book industry and film/television, the convention has increasingly become home to Hollywood and the entertainment industry at large within the past decade.  Despite being an initial focus of the convention, the major film and television studios have inserted their dominance over its media attention and convention hall space.   These media giants brought with them a perceived imperialistic presence that created a social hierarchy, which fans of geek culture used to avoid at comic conventions.   Tickets that were available for convention goers have now been set aside en masse for agents, managers, film and TV celebrities, and their entourages.  With this transformation, serious concerns have surfaced with regard to overcrowding, ticket sales, and angst amongst convention patrons, who long for the days of being able to enjoy the convention for its original purpose without having to fight the crowds.  This year, with pre-ordered tickets selling out at astronomical rates and booth availability for independent comic book vendors becoming more sparse, fans have been forced to deal with multiple failed attempts to purchase online tickets due to server overload.

Over the past decade, I have become increasingly dismayed with the “films” coming out of Hollywood.  Of course, you know that I am talking about the fetishization of pop-culture nostalgia.  Let’s face it; they just don’t make movies like they used to.  From Transformers to G.I. Joe, from The Karate Kid to Teen Wolf (it is going to be on MTV – and do not even get me started on the topic of “Music Television...”), it is difficult (editor’s note: impossible) to name a recent big-budget film that is not a remake/reboot/reimagining/reinventing/sequel/prequel/sidequel.  Some may argue that there are only “seven original stories in existence,” but, let’s be honest here; this is a completely specious argument.  At the end of the day, all humans eat, breath, and sleep, but are their lives all the same?

While furthering our knowledge of the origin and nature of theoretical physics, physicist Stephen Hawking has become one of the most vital scientific minds since Albert Einstein.  Hawking has accomplished revolutionary work on the existence of black holes and published multiple best-selling books on his scientific discoveries over the past 40 years.  Overcoming great professional and personal obstacles such as his battle with Lou Gehrig’s disease (ALS), Hawking earned legendary status among his fellow physicists with his notable endeavor to understand the universe.  With his most successful book, A Brief History of Time, he explained the evolution of his thinking about the cosmos for general audiences, earning him status as an accessible genius and a household name.  Hardly slowed by his battle with ALS, Hawking has continued his research into theoretical physics, written another book, and traveled the globe giving lectures to the general public.  

First and foremost, I am a rabid David Sedaris fan.  I was first introduced to the humorous essayist just over a year ago with his 2008 book, When You Are Engulfed in Flames.  Ever since, I have read almost every one of his books within one sitting;  I just cannot put them down.  I expected no less from his most recent work, Squirrel Seeks Chipmunk, a collection of short stories that highlights questions of morality and societal ills as enacted by animals.  While no less comical than his previous stories, this brief book provides the present-day reader with opportunities to laugh and learn from the assorted creatures who share our trials and tribulations in raising children, alienation from friends, adultery, and racism.  


David Sedaris is many things: writer, humorist, and radio contributor for National Public Radio, often working with Ira Glass’ “This American Life.”  (Perhaps not well known is the fact that Glass discovered Sedaris in a Chicago club, reading stories from his diary.)  Known for his short stories which are, in most cases, autobiographical (yet exaggerated) and self-defacing, Sedaris has enjoyed several, national bestsellers with Naked, Holidays On Ice (featuring his acclaimed essay “SantaLand Diaries," which was first introduced on NPR), Me Talk Pretty One Day, Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim, and When You Are Engulfed in Flames.  The stories feature accounts of his family’s inner-workings, his numerous odd jobs across the county, and his various follies into drugs that are downright hysterical.  The events are sometimes so far-fetched that part of the fun is wondering where the truth leaves off and the exaggeration begins.  Despite the repetition of some stories in multiple books, the occurrence only allows the reader to re-experience the humor that may have been forgotten.

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