With Thanksgiving fast approaching, we often find ourselves becoming more introspective, reflecting on the people and things for which we are thankful. As we at Fanbase Press celebrate fandoms, this year, the Fanbase Press staff and contributors have chosen to honor their favorite fandoms, characters, or other elements of geekdom for which they are thankful, and how those areas of geekiness have shaped their lives and values.

With Thanksgiving fast approaching, we often find ourselves becoming more introspective, reflecting on the people and things for which we are thankful. As we at Fanbase Press celebrate fandoms, this year, the Fanbase Press staff and contributors have chosen to honor their favorite fandoms, characters, or other elements of geekdom for which they are thankful, and how those areas of geekiness have shaped their lives and values.

With Thanksgiving fast approaching, we often find ourselves becoming more introspective, reflecting on the people and things for which we are thankful. As we at Fanbase Press celebrate fandoms, this year, the Fanbase Press staff and contributors have chosen to honor their favorite fandoms, characters, or other elements of geekdom for which they are thankful, and how those areas of geekiness have shaped their lives and values.

On Monday, November 12, geekdom lost a legend.  Born in Manhattan in the early 1920s, Stanley Martin Lieber was raised with his younger brother in the Bronx.  Entertained by Errol Flynn’s swashbuckling roles being shown on the silver screen, Stan Lee was influenced by heroic stories.  He began writing obituaries and press releases, as well as working a number of odd jobs.  After graduating from high school, he became an assistant at Timely Comics in 1939, and it was the start of an incredibly long career in comics . . . and geekdom!

Much like one of his greatest creations, much like myself, and much like many others who held issues of Spider-Man in their hands as children, Stan Martin Lieber came from very humble beginnings. In a way, that’s precisely why he will always be remembered as one of the greatest comic book creators that ever lived. He took the unstoppable - the unbeatable - and made them relatable and flawed. He gave his characters with the same kind of humble beginnings and human characteristics that he undoubtedly lived through, just like any of us dealt with. He brought his insecurities to the page. Before Stan Lee left his stamp on the comic book industry, everyone looked up to heroes, but Lee made everyone feel like they could be heroes, too, simply by dealing with the “every day.”

It was ten years ago today that the animated cartoon, Star Wars: The Clone Wars, premiered on the Cartoon Network. The series followed on the heels of an animated film by the same name that had been released in August, 2008. Spanning six seasons, the TV series was set during the prequel films, Attack of the Clones and Revenge of the Sith and conveyed events that took place in the Star Wars universe during a three-year period of time that was not portrayed in the films. The show has the distinction of becoming the most watched series premiere in the history of Cartoon Network and was nominated (and won) several awards; however, news of cancellation was not well received by fans of the series, and the last episode became available on Netflix on March 7, 2014. Fortunately, at this summer’s San Diego Comic-Con, fans rejoiced when Lucasfilm announced that the series would return with 12 episodes which will be released on Disney’s streaming channel in 2019.

This year marks the 10th anniversary of Star Wars: The Clone Wars, the animated series created by George Lucas and supervised under the leadership of Dave Filoni (Avatar: The Last Airbender). While there are many amazing accomplishments and meaningful additions to the Star Wars mythology that come from The Clone Wars series, for many fans (myself included), the greatest gift the animated show has offered are the various ways that Lucas and Filoni's series filled out, patched up, and, frankly, improved upon the much-derided Star Wars prequel films. Below are several of the most important and impactful ways the prequels retroactively benefited from the existence of The Clone Wars series.

A little film premiered on October 1, 1968, which told the story of seven people who barricaded themselves in a rural farmhouse in western Pennsylvania one night. Night of the Living Dead was George A. Romero’s first feature-length film after having shot short films, TV commercials, and even a segment for Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood. Romero directed, photographed, edited, and co-wrote the film on a budget of $114,000. It became a cult classic, spawning a number of sequels and remakes; however, it also revolutionized the horror genre, as well as redefined the concept of the zombie. Now fifty years strong, Fanbase Press commemorates the 50th anniversary of Night of the Living Dead with this special editorial essay from horror writer/scholar Dr. Kevin Wetmore. – Ed.

O golden-tongued action film with serene lute!
   Fair plumed T’challa! King of far away! (Wakanda Forever!)
   Leave melodizing on this summer day,
Shut up thine director’s commentary, and be mute:
Adieu! for once again the fierce dispute,
   Betwixt damnation and impassion'd clay
   Must I burn through; once more humbly assay
The bitter-sweet of this Whedonesque fruit.
Thanos! and ye Guardians of the Galaxy,
   Begetters of our deep eternal theme,
When through the Marvel Cinematic Universe I am gone,
   Let me not wander in a barren dream,
But when I am consumed in the fire,
Give me new some infinity stones and an Iron Man suit
    to fly at my desire.

“Fundamental Comics,” a monthly editorial series that introduces readers to comics, graphic novels, and manga that have been impactful to the sequential art medium and the comic book industry on a foundational level. Each month, a new essay will examine a familiar or less-known title through an in-depth analysis, exploring the history of the title, significant themes, and context for the title’s popularity since it was first released.

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