With Thanksgiving fast approaching, we often find ourselves becoming more introspective, reflecting on the people and things for which we are thankful.  As we at Fanbase Press celebrate fandoms, this year, the Fanbase Press staff and contributors have chosen to honor their favorite fandoms, characters, or other elements of geekdom for which they are thankful, and how those areas of geekiness have shaped their lives and values.

With Thanksgiving fast approaching, we often find ourselves becoming more introspective, reflecting on the people and things for which we are thankful.  As we at Fanbase Press celebrate fandoms, this year, the Fanbase Press staff and contributors have chosen to honor their favorite fandoms, characters, or other elements of geekdom for which they are thankful, and how those areas of geekiness have shaped their lives and values.

With Thanksgiving fast approaching, we often find ourselves becoming more introspective, reflecting on the people and things for which we are thankful.  As we at Fanbase Press celebrate fandoms, this year, the Fanbase Press staff and contributors have chosen to honor their favorite fandoms, characters, or other elements of geekdom for which they are thankful, and how those areas of geekiness have shaped their lives and values.

With Thanksgiving fast approaching, we often find ourselves becoming more introspective, reflecting on the people and things for which we are thankful.  As we at Fanbase Press celebrate fandoms, this year, the Fanbase Press staff and contributors have chosen to honor their favorite fandoms, characters, or other elements of geekdom for which they are thankful, and how those areas of geekiness have shaped their lives and values.

The video game Horizon: Zero Dawn is set in a post-apocalyptic world, where humanity survives by hunting and scavenging from machines. The megafauna of our world are replaced by robotic counterparts, with creatures ranging from horse-analogues to mechanical Tyrannosaurus Rex.  The world’s origins are gradually meted out as the player delves further and further into the story, and the player as Aloy discovers more about the apocalypse that changed the planet.

The goblins and ghouls at Fanbase Press would like to wish you and yours a Happy Halloween! Today is a day to showcase our cosplay love, carve pumpkins, eat far too much candy, draw Pagan symbols on the floor and then accidentally spray human blood on them, thereby unleashing Gachnar who terrorizes the students of UC Sunnydale . . . I mean . . . you know, the regular Halloween things that you do . . .

There are quite a few ways to celebrate Halloween and the general spookiness of October, such as marathoning scary films and binge-reading horror comics and books. Gamers often turn to playing horror-centric video games during the month. The newly created #horrorgameoct hashtag is being used to call attention to the practice, with gamers announcing their intentions to play popular survival-horror games such as those from the Resident Evil, Silent Hill, and Dead Space series. It is also a perfect opportunity for some to revisit forgotten or cult games, such as Deadly Premonition and Phantasmagoria. It’s even an excuse to play off-beat or periphery scary games too, such as Dr. Franken and Corpse Killer.

Production began last week on James Cameron’s very-long-in-gestation sequels to Avatar.  At the same time, Fox announced last week that the four (Four!) sequels to the biggest international hit of all time will cost $1 billion to produce.  The film world seemed to gasp a bit at the price tag, but $250 million per film isn’t all that unheard of when it comes to giant films like this, and Cameron will no doubt be doing what he always does and push the limitations of what’s possible on film.  Titanic cost $200 million to make, and that was 20 years ago.  Adjusted for inflation, Titanic would cost $305 million to make today.  Rumors at the time suggested the first Avatar cost $500 million to make because of all of the R & D that went into creating it.  These new Avatar films are a relative bargain by comparison.  The original Avatar made $2.7 billion worldwide.  Even if the interest for the sequels isn’t there and the four new films each make 50% less than the original, you’re still looking at a collective $5.4 billion gross against a $1 billion budget.  Greenlighting this project is the biggest possible no-brainer short of printing your own money.

In 1982, Ridley Scott directed Blade Runner, his vision of a futuristic, dystopian, neo-noir science fiction film which was loosely adapted from the Philip K. Dick novel, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Neon store-front lights reflect in the rain slicked Los Angeles of 2019 as brightly lit dirigibles rumbled across the dark sky, flashing elaborate advertisements overhead. All manners of life – human and replicant – commingle, trying to find meaning and memorable moments that culminate into a comforting identity. Drawing on themes of religion, technology, implications of genetic engineering, and an examination of humanity, Blade Runner has captivated decades of audiences with not one but seven versions of the 1982 film.  In honor of the original (or the six other versions) and the highly anticipated Blade Runner 2049 releasing today, Fanbase Press is running a special editorial series to examine the original film and its lasting influence in popular culture.

In 1982, Ridley Scott directed Blade Runner, his vision of a futuristic, dystopian, neo-noir science fiction film which was loosely adapted from the Philip K. Dick novel, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Neon store-front lights reflect in the rain slicked Los Angeles of 2019 as brightly lit dirigibles rumbled across the dark sky, flashing elaborate advertisements overhead. All manners of life – human and replicant – commingle, trying to find meaning and memorable moments that culminate into a comforting identity. Drawing on themes of religion, technology, implications of genetic engineering, and an examination of humanity, Blade Runner has captivated decades of audiences with not one but seven versions of the 1982 film.  In honor of the original (or the six other versions) and the highly anticipated Blade Runner 2049 releasing today, Fanbase Press is running a special editorial series to examine the original film and its lasting influence in popular culture.

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