After Sarah and Miss LaFleur find Arlen Quincy hiding in the walls of his own house, it becomes apparent that he faked his own death. But why?

Every issue of Home Sick Pilots that I read blows my mind. I’m generally good at sussing out where something is going; there’s a natural step by step progression that - when it happens - is almost like it was obvious that it was supposed to happen that way. Every step forward that this series takes makes complete and total sense, it’s so freaking crazy that I don’t know what could happen next. No idea. In every issue, a new element is added that just keeps the ball sailing further out of the stadium.

Wynd has grown from a personal story of escape from a bigoted city into a world of political intrigue and war games. Our scrappy band of heroes, now with Wynd 2.0 at their helm, is having to step up their game, because a bunch of nasty Vampyres want their wings back, and there’s only one way to get them… start a war. Who lives and who dies after the chaos of the last issue? I guess you’ll just have to read issue 10 to find out!

This one-shot was surprisingly potent. It’s the first time Mike Mignola has written something with someone other than Christopher Golden in a short while. Chris Roberson certainly brings a dynamic that’s fresh and helps build a lot out of very little.

In 1967, Star Trek first explored the concept of parallel universes in the second season episode, "Mirror, Mirror." In it, Captain Kirk found himself in a reality in which humans had formed the Terran Empire and were brutal rulers, the opposite of the peaceful explorers the audience was so familiar with. Star Trek: Deep Space Nine revisited this universe several times, establishing that the Terran Empire was overthrown by the Klingons and the Cardassians and the human race was enslaved. In 2017, IDW began their exploration of this universe with several mini-series featuring the crew of The Next Generation. In the same continuity of DS9, remains of the Terran Empire still exist, fighting a resistance against the Klingons and Cardassians. Star Trek: The Mirror War #0 is the beginning of a 13-issue series which continues this story.

Tales of an apocalypse in the making have been popular in comics for a while. Whether it’s a zombie tale like The Walking Dead or a gender extinction like Y: The Last Man, society and humanity are always in deep trouble with little hope of survival. What makes a series like Dark Horse’s Last Flight Out unique is its timing. Coming out after (and clearly influenced by) the deadly Coronavirus pandemic, this series is able to bring in elements of real life that would have seemed to be pure fantasy a mere 2 years ago.

Last month, I momentarily thought I was going to get a new Jeff Lemire series that wasn’t related to Black Hammer. I love every moment we get in the world of Black Hammer, but I also like to dip into creators’ heads in different ways, as well. I loved, loved, loved Gideon Falls. So, when I saw Mazebook pop up, I was really excited to read it. My excitement has been appeased.

Now with two Unbelievable Unteens, their memories retrieved, they set off to find their old team members. Along the way, we find memory breadcrumbs of how the team lost their own memories and were given normal lives.

Previously on Buffy the Vampire Slayer, things were tensing up on both sides of the Slayer schism, with each side gearing up to fight a common enemy (Silas), but are they prepared to work together towards a shared goal? After a good, long while of doubting her place in the world (or multiverse!), Buffy had an epiphany about how to possibly fight a battle that’s stacked against them.  

Four issues ago, Death lost her job because someone (Darius Shah) was being born that would make her job pointless; this baby would grow up to end death. So, Death was given human form in Laila Star, and over the past four issues, we’ve seen Laila live, only to die while watching this baby grow to adulthood—always missing her chance to try and stop him before dying again.

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