I started Gideon Falls #4 worried that it would be all exposition, but about a third of the way in, it breaks your mind and puts you on edge until the final page.

Issue #3 of Steve Orlando and Garry Brown’s Crude starts to find its way again after a second issue that I felt pulled us too far away from the central story. It set up the ins and outs of a world that dramatically didn’t need to be set up yet.

It’s no secret that I love Matt Kindt’s work. You can look through my reviews of his comics over the last three years. There’s very rarely a negatively tinged review, and if there is, it’s full of trust that he knows what he’s doing, even if I don’t see it yet…and I’m usually correct, and he’s usually amazing.

I have absolutely no idea what’s going on in Black Hammer right now, but it looks like we’re about to find out! The beginning of this story arc had the newly transformed Lucy Weber, now Black Hammer, exclaim that she knew what was going on, and then she was teleported away. Infuriating to say the least! The last two issues have seen our heroes, who have been trapped on a Twilight Zone-style farmhouse, move forward with renewed hope. After only seeing them in states of malaise, it’s been a welcome change. Meanwhile, Lucy has tumbled through some strange realities. If our heroes in their youth represent the Golden Age of comics, and our heroes now represent the indie world of comics, then these alternate realms have represented the '90s!

At the end of the Geek-Girl mini-series with Ruby Kaye, both she and Lightning Storm (a powerful nemesis) were down for the count.  Ruby partially succeeded, since her foe wasn’t able to continue her rampage across Maine, but she’s in the hospital in a coma with an unclear recovery.  Who will pick up the superhero mantle and keep the Pine Tree state safe?  Find out in the first volume of the latest Geek-Girl comic!

I have no idea what the hell I just read, only that it was insane…ly good and completely, utterly insane. Mars. 2770. A technologically advanced human civilization is mourning the loss of the inhabitants of Earth. This is a different Mars than what we’re used to seeing on the Rover. Grass and freeways littered throughout cityscapes. In the midst of it all, a news weatherman, Nathan Bright, gives the weather like a rock star as shock jock. People love him. He’s a celebrity.

Simon Spurrier and Matías Bergara create for us the apocalyptic aftermath of a Dungeons & Dragons-style world with their comic, Coda, in which magic no longer exists and mighty kingdoms have fallen. It’s basically like Mad Max up in here with mean-ass unicorns instead of tricked-out vehicles.

“To infinity and beyond!” The joyous exclamation is the same experience readers will have when they jump into Jupiter Jet. The trade paperback collects Issues #1 through #5 and is a perfect example of a fun-loving story full of adventure that anyone of any age will enjoy.

It's difficult to quantify Doctor Who. The series has stretched through multiple generations, soft reboots, and spinoffs. While some folks might love one iteration of the character, they may find another less compelling. Doctor Who: Seventh Doctor #1: Operation Volcano naturally follows the 7th version of the iconic character, famously played by Sylvester McCoy in the TV series.

Something inspired me recently to take a journey into the world of Hellboy. It was sheer coincidence that new collections made their way down the pipeline for me to review. After reading Hellboy: The Complete Short Stories, I can say that I had no idea there were so many great Hellboy stories. This collection is chock full of them and contains some of my favorites to date.

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