It’s here!  The day has finally arrived!  Sure, it’s the first day of September, and who the heck knows where the rest of the year went so quickly, but it’s also…

Right from the beginning of this anthology, writer/creator Corey Lewis admits that his brain can be kind of all over the place. Sun Bakery is his attempt to collect the projects that have arisen from those rather scattered thoughts, all in one place. The result is a number of strange and surreal worlds that don’t always make sense, but are nonetheless entertaining.

I hesitate to call this a Steampunk story, as purists will note that its 1920s setting is a little late to qualify; however, it certainly has many of the elements of Steampunk, as well as a similar overall sense of fun and adventure. Whatever you call it, it’s brilliant and entertaining.

Fred Van Lente, Ryan Dunlavey, and Adam Guzowski’s The Comic Book History of Comics: Birth of a Medium is a treatise on the place of comics as an important part of the fabric of American popular culture. Readers who are familiar with American history and culture may catch that Birth of a Medium is a citation of D. W Griffith’s early American film, Birth of a Nation, but non-American readers (like me!) may not get the reference and may be surprised at the American-centric nature of this text. Though I do think that readers will want to be aware that Birth of a Medium doesn’t offer a comprehensive account of the rise of comics as a medium globally, I count the extreme focus of the text as a positive; Lente and Dunlavey are excellent historians of American comics, and they’ve produced a detailed and relatively balanced text on that topic.

Ghostbusters 101 #6 concludes a major plot point from the beginning of the series. It seems to end the dimensional rift that is causing the two universes of the old Ghostbusters and more recent Ghostbusters team to come together. Seeing them interact within this comic gives the reader the chance to fully understand the scope of everything. Dr. Ray Stantz is leading the troops out in the streets in order to fight the ghost trapped between the two universes, linking them together.



After a delay, Joelle Jones’ Lady Killer throttles into the final act with Issue #5 of the second series, leaving the door open for a third. Freaking exciting in all regards!

Being back in the world of Alex De Campi's Bankshot is a good feeling, though not one I've yet to fully understand. After last issue, we saw Marcus King - and how he became the unstoppable force he is - repaired by a controversial and dangerous science after being shot in the back and left for dead. Paralyzed, he was given a second chance and the ability to walk again, with some upgrades. Now, he fights for himself, with both the American government and his biggest adversary, a man known as the Dutchman, out to stop him. The only problem is that this is harder to gauge than is preferred.

Is that it?  Is it over? 

Ion Grip is a futuristic tale that mixes government spy agencies and space adventures into one. The story is filled with classic ray guns, intergalactic action sequences, vibrant colors, and a main character who sometimes fails to win a fight.

IDW's Donald and Mickey reads less like old stories involving the characters and more like a cross of stories between the old '60s Batman television series and Hannah Barbara cartoons like Scooby-Doo which became infamous. Of course, these stories obviously have Donald Duck and Mickey Mouse in them, but it's a tad confusing when the villain in Mickey's story seems similar to both The Riddler and a random ghoul from an episode of Scooby-Doo. In one direct reference, writer Andrea Castellan makes in "The Big Fat Flat Blot Plot," she names one of the cops as Chief O'Hara, a character who had great fame in Batman on Fox during the 1960s.



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