Batman animatedThe Top Four series looks at certain aspects of the comic book world from two perspectives: Rob’s, as a relative newcomer to mainstream comics, and Kristine’s, as an older hand in the world.  Each installment evaluates the top four choices from both Rob and Kristine and why they chose their picks.



By Robert J. Baden and Kristine Chester

 

 

While there haven’t been that many shows based on comic books, there are still quite a few out there, and we grew up watching cartoons of comic characters as a supplement, or even as a replacement, for the comics themselves.  Despite the fact that we’re now adults, we still enjoy the cartoons based on comics, including such recent titles as Young Justice and Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes.  We also watch many of the live action shows which drew their inspiration from comics with titles like Smallville and The Walking Dead, still fresh or currently in the public eye.  As such, we’ve identified the shows (based on comic books) that we believe are the best.

 

 

SPOILERS BELOW

 

 

Dragon AgeThe Dragon Age video games have become known for their intricate plot lines and intriguing characters, and the new graphic novel from Dark Horse brings the best aspects of the video game to the printed page. Gaider and Freed weave an interesting tale that spins out of the previous video games without relying on them too much.

 

Dorian Gray 1Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray has resisted successful adaption for over a hundred years now, and now the boys at Bluewater Productions are taking a stab at it.  

 

SW Boba Fett 4The conclusion to Star Wars: Blood Ties—Boba Fett is Dead is here.  In the interest of not spoiling the ending for anyone, this review will be kept short.

MINOR SPOILERS BELOW

 

BBComic 0112As the Managing Editor of Fanboy Comics, I have the distinct honor and privilege to work with amazingly talented individuals throughout geek culture: actors, writers, artists, directors, photographers . . . the list is endless.  It is always a pleasure to learn more about their craft and to follow their artistic endeavors throughout various stages of the creative process.  Needless to say, when the opportunity arose to work with one such industry professional on a comic book-themed photo shoot, I jumped at the chance!

BW Silk Spectre 2The comic book event of the summer is nigh!  Before Watchmen, the much-anticipated prequel series to Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons' Watchmen, will consist of seven limited series and an epilogue one-shot.  Stay tuned, as the Fanboy Comics crew will be reviewing each title as it is released. Hurm. 

 


This second issue of Silk Spectre shares many of the strengths I pointed out in my review of the last issue: the art is great, the characters are well-rounded and expressive, and the writing is solid. This issue breaks down a bit, but it remains a compelling next chapter in the story of Laurie Jupiter’s early years.

 

To Read ListSo, I just survived another San Diego Comic-Con. It was an amazing weekend of meeting new friends, making business contacts, and buying books . . . buying lots of books. You see, I have a bit of a problem. I buy way more books than I can read, and when a new convention rolls around, I do it all over again. I decided at this year's show that I needed to remedy this somehow.

 My wife reminded me of one of our favorite books, The Polysyllabic Spree by Nick Hornby, a collection of articles where Hornby tries to tackle his own book obsession. So, I decided to steal his idea and apply it to my graphic novel obsession. Over the next year, I will regularly blog about my graphic novel reading habits. I will start each blog with a list of which books are on my 'To Read' list, which books I've bought, and which books I read. I will then blog about why I bought what I did, why I read what I did, and what I thought about what I read.


This is mostly a therapeutic way to deal with my obsession but may also be an interesting experiment in blogging and graphic novel reviews. Stick around and see what the wonderful world of comics holds for me. Without further ado, the 'To Read' List:

Green Arrow 152 Catch Up is a series devoted to looking at issues from DC's New 52 and seeing how they're faring now that they're underway, why they're worth reading (or not), and places we hope they will go in time.

 

Concept:

 

Multi-billionaire playboy and philanthropist Oliver Queen, known for his innovative technologies, spends his days running away from his responsibilities and his nights shooting hypersonic arrows to fight crime.  He has no powers, no abilities, no special skills, but the backup of two friends and the trained eye of a marksman.  A mundane man in the world of the super-powered, he is the Green Arrow.

 
 

SPOILERS BELOW

Batman and Robin with Review52 Catch Up is a series devoted to looking at issues from DC's New 52 and seeing how they're faring now that they're underway, why they're worth reading (or not), and places we hope they will go in time.

 

 

Concept:

Ten years ago, Batman had a relationship with Talia al Ghul, daughter to the villain Ra'as al Ghul. Years later, Batman met Damian, his and Talia's son, who had been trained by the League of Assassins to be a brutal killer. Damian broke away from the League to join his father and became the new Robin, but he still has a lot to learn about what it means to be a hero and a Wayne.

 

 

 

 

 

MAJOR SPOILERS BELOW

capt-marvel-jamie-mckelvieFanboy Comics Contributor Jason Enright brings you his top comic book picks for the week.

 



Captain Marvel #1
by Kelly Sue DeConnick and Dexter Soy

Captain Marvel is back! Kelly Sue DeConnick has brought Carol Danvers, one of my all-time favorite Avengers, back to her own series, and she is not living in anyone’s shadow anymore. This is an awesome comic. It’s packed with, action, emotion, humor, and amazing art. Wow! I don’t know where Stephen Wacker and C.B. Cebulski found Dexter Soy, but his art is really cool. He pencils, inks, and colors the whole book. I especially love the layout of this book; no two pages use the same layout, and he uses the panels in unique ways to convey the sense of movement in the book’s action scenes.  Everyone should buy this book on Wednesday. It is truly a work of art. If that’s not enough to convince you to buy the book, then check out this interview I did with Kelly Sue a while back about this book, which can be found here

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