Carson Napier’s Venusian adventures continue in issue two of Carson of Venus: The Flames Beyond. In this installment, Varlek Sar has taken Napier captive and brought him to his lab in the technocratic city-state of Havatoo. Sar has built a device that is able to not only make Napier’s astral projections manifest physically, but also to duplicate the projections, as well. He coerces Napier into his machine for dastardly results. Meanwhile,  Napier’s betrothed Duare attempts to rally the different races and nations of Venus to attack Havatoo to not only free Napier, but to save the planet from tyranny.

The Weatherman is wonderfully bonkers. Sometimes, it’s a gonzo satire right out of Philip K. Dick’s mind, and, other times, it’s an action-packed free-for-all.

Even though I missed Issue #3, here I am reading Issue #4 of Punk Mambo, and Cullen Bunn is such a great writer that I don’t feel lost. What happened in the last issue? Punk Mambo got her ass whooped. Mambo is all punk, from outfit to attitude. She also practices voodoo magic, and a not-so-nice enemy is attempting to collect all of the LOA for himself. The LOA are the sort of spirits that give Mambo a large element of her magic capabilities.

The flying turtles are back! I was wondering when we’d see them again. They were shown briefly in Issue #1, and I’ve been looking for them ever since.  Despite not seeing any flying turtles for a couple of issues, the team of Lemire and Nguyen do not disappoint in this fourth issue of the ongoing series.

No place in the world is safe in the hands of Cullen Bunn, but when teamed up with Brian Hurtt and Tyler Crook, creepy characters, plots twists, and evil abound.

A quick recap of Angel #2: Issue #2 showed us a bit more of Angel’s dark past with Mara, the warrior he corrupted to his cause.  We also get an idea of the MO of Angel’s death squad: They’re harbingers of the apocalypse. In the present, after a conversation with Lilith, he’s clued into the new innocent that he has to protect. A fan favorite character is introduced in a different, but somewhat familiar, context. Spoiler alert: It’s Fred!

It's almost here. The finale of one of the most impressive comic book series of the modern era is upon us, with the release of the penultimate issue of The Wicked + The Divine. Over the last five years, we've seen the growth of this series from a well-known favorite to a true classic. The quality has always been there, but the consistency is what makes this book as amazing as it is. It's one thing to have a good few issues or maybe a great arc. But for forty-four issues, this series has been impressing readers over and over, giving us new twists to savor, new characters to love, and a new reason to keep reading with each successive issue. I've been covering this series for a long time, and what keeps me coming back to the series each time is what is likely the same as it is for many readers: It's really, really good.

Just when you thought the Predator was too ashamed to show his "ugly" face again, the intergalactic big game hunter is back again to terrorize the few remaining survivors of 2015's Archie vs. Predator (with writer Alex de Campi returning, backed by the art team of Robert Hack, Kelly Fitzpatrick, and Jack Morelli this time) from Dark Horse Comics. If you thought the last round between Arnie's extra-terrestrial buddy and the Riverdale gang was hilarious, disturbing, and off the wall... well, you ain't seen nothing yet!

Madeleine Holly-Rosing’s Boston Metaphysical Society series spans several other comics, some short stories, and even a novel. It’s a beautiful and intricate world, with a lot to take in. The Spirit of Rebellion is billed as a standalone story which you can enjoy without necessarily being familiar with the rest of the oeuvre. Technically, this is true. Anything you do need to know about the previous adventures is covered deftly in Holly-Rosing’s introduction.

Imagine being in a world where everyone around you is special and extraordinary, but you’re the odd one out for being ordinary. That’s what’s happening to Princess Basil, the seventh daughter of a king and queen who was blessed with being ordinary while her sisters were blessed with beauty, humor, and other special talents. Extraordinary, written and drawn by Cassie Anderson, is a story about a girl who isn’t “normal” and who seeks adventure, looking for purpose.

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