The DC reboot is upon us, comic book sniffers! Welcome to the new DC universe! In an effort to help bring new readers into the world of comics, the Fanboy Comics staff has decided to review at least five new #1 issues each week of September, DC’s reboot launch month.

 

Alright, so... another Wednesday, another cache of new DCnU comics.  Among others, look for those reviews later, I purchased Grifter, written by Nathan Edmonson and penciled by the uni-monikered Cafu.  A few spoilers to follow, but don’t worry, I won’t actually ruin anything that isn’t ruined by the cover.

The DC reboot is upon us, comic book sniffers! Welcome to the new DC universe! In an effort to help bring new readers into the world of comics, the Fanboy Comics staff has decided to review at least five new #1 issues each week of September, DC’s reboot launch month.

 

Let me start out by saying, my only experience with the Storm Watchers (can I call them “Storm Watchers?”) is from reading The Authority.  If you’ve also read The Authority, you will know that these characters and their ship are AWESOME [Editor’s note: an industry term]!  Storm Watch is a super-team of “professional” heroes.  The “Mr. Pinks” in a world of “Mr. Whites,” and, as Jack Hawksmoor puts it, “You won’t catch [them] in a cape.”  The powers among the various team members are as various as they are unconventional. Barefoot in his black skinny tie and suit, Hawksmoor communicates with cities, and, honestly, it just gets harder to explain from there.  Though each teammate has a unique costume like their more well-known counterparts (Superman, Batman, Dr. Strange, etc.), Storm Watch reads more like a Science Fiction comic in the sense that the current sociopolitical world makes up about a third of the fight that these characters struggle against (the other two-thirds being, respectively, big, evil monsters and personal demons).      

The DC reboot is upon us, comic book sniffers! Welcome to the new DC universe! In an effort to help bring new readers into the world of comics, the Fanboy Comics staff has decided to review at least five new #1 issues each week of September, DC’s reboot launch month.

 

DC’s new Detective Comics #1, written and penciled by Tony Salvador Daniel and inked by Ryan Winn, is amazing, and I say that with no reservations. This issue is a comic that grabs you from the first page, sinks its claws into you, and never lets go. Daniel has not just created a fantastic, epic, and moody Batman tale, but also a perfect example of what the DC reboot standard should be!

SPOILERS BELOW

The DC reboot is upon us, comic book sniffers! Welcome to the new DC universe! In an effort to help bring new readers into the world of comics, the Fanboy Comics staff has decided to review at least five new #1 issues each week of September, DC’s reboot launch month.


DC rebooted their titles to entice new fans who may have been previously unfamiliar with their comic books, right?  

I read my first DCnU comic book, Swamp Thing #1, written by Scott Snyder and art by Yanick Paquette, with no knowledge of the Swamp Thing character or its previous story lines.  After reading the comic, I can confidently say that I still have no knowledge of who Swamp Thing is nor how it came to be.

 

SPOILERS AHEAD

The DC reboot is upon us, comic book sniffers! Welcome to the new DC universe! In an effort to help bring new readers into the world of comics, the Fanboy Comics staff has decided to review at least five new #1 issues each week of September, DC’s reboot launch month.

This week brought us Action Comics #1 written by Grant Morrison and penciled by Rags Morales. This is the first time in DC’s history that Action Comics has ever been renumbered, and I consider myself the perfect target audience for this book: a comic book reader with only the most basic exposure to Superman comics who has always felt that the character was too hokey, too bland, and too powerful to be interesting. While Morrision’s first issue of Action Comics didn’t solve all my problems with the character, it is a book that reeks of potential down the road.

SPOILERS BELOW

The DC reboot is upon us, comic book sniffers! Welcome to the new DC universe! In an effort to help bring new readers into the world of comics, the Fanboy Comics staff has decided to review at least five new #1 issues each week of September, DC’s reboot launch month.

 

Okay, okay, so you want to bring Barbara Gordon back to the action?  Make her Batgirl once again?  But, wait - what about Stephanie Brown, Cassandra Cain, Helena Bertinelli (albeit briefly and before sacked by Batman), or Betty Kane?  (Ah ha! You forgot about Betty Kane, didn’t you? Well, Wikipedia didn’t!)  I mean, isn’t Barbara Gordon Oracle?  Who’s going to be Oracle now?  Okay, DC, I’ll shut up and read the comic.

Fanboy Comics President Bryant Dillon and Creative Director Sam Rhodes could not resist reading and reviewing their first DCnU #1 together!

 

The DC reboot is upon us, comic book sniffers! Welcome to the new DC universe! In an effort to help bring new readers into the world of comics, the Fanboy Comics staff has decided to review at least five new #1 issues each week of September, DC’s reboot launch month.

We kick off this week with a double review of the only new DC universe title released last week: Justice League of America written by Geoff Johns, with art by Jim Lee!

Let me start off by saying the title above is not a slight against IDW. They provided a home for Angel in the comic world when no one else would. Much like UPN, they should be remembered by fans as a savior to the series in a time of need, and both proved themselves worthy wards of the characters and stories we love. That being said, all Buffy and Angel characters are under the same roof (shared universe achieved!), and, if Angel & Faith #1 by Christos Gage and Rebekah Issacs is an example of where we’re heading, then I am one happy comic book sniffer!

SPOILERS BELOW

 

The third issue of Pariah, like the two before, focuses on a single “Vitro,” (part of a batch of children treated with in vitro cures for a rare and fatal genetic disease, who have demonstrated rapid, unexpected, and stratospheric levels of intelligence upon reaching puberty.  Duh.) only this one happens to be a sociopath.  He’s like a pubescent Hannibal Lector... but with less restraint.  We first meet Robert Maudsley sitting on a park bench, an innocuous 13-year-old casually manipulating a stranger out of his hoagie.  We then follow Maudsley through the next two years of his life, accented by a series of destructive, often violent, incidents, all of which he has orchestrated in order to achieve some selfish purpose or out of sheer curiosity.  With no moral compass in evidence, the hyper-intelligence of a “vitro,” and a will to see how far he can push people, Robert Maudsley is like some child with a magnifying glass in a world full of ants.

10 Canon-Worthy Moments from Angel: After The Fall

SPOILERS BELOW


With the launch of Dark Horse Comics’ Angel & Faith series upon us, I wanted to recap some of the truly canon-worthy moments of IDW’s Angel: After The Fall. If you haven’t had a chance to read Brian Lynch’s epic “sixth season” of Angel, then you’ve really missed out. While IDW’s Angel series had a shaky path once they began switching writers, Lynch’s After The Fall is a triumph, managing to feel like a true and worthy chapter in the Angel series. Some of this can be attributed to the fortune Lynch had in being able to meet and take notes from Joss himself before starting to write, but it takes a truly talented individual to craft a tale where the characters feel so right, yet are still pushed to places you’d never imagined! I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, Lynch is the new Joss.

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