Bizarre, emotional, and strangely poignant. Not really the words I expected to use when talking about a video game tie-in comic, but this is where I find myself with today’s outing. Minecraft: Stories from the Overworld is a curious anthology of tales set in the Minecraft universe. Somewhat akin to Minecraft: Volume 1, which I reviewed earlier this year, Stories from the Overworld has the same feeling as its predecessor but gives different artists and writers the chance to cut their teeth on the Minecraft world.

World War II is coming to an end, but the Black Hammer Squadron has one last mission. The elite group of African American pilots, under the command of Captain "Hammer" Hawthorne, is tasked with rescuing a family of scientists from a concentration camp. They battle through occult German forces, mechanized Soviet soldiers, and come face to face with The Ghost Hunter, the deadliest Nazi pilot in the sky. The world of Black Hammer goes to war in this high-flying adventure from artist Matt Kindt and co-writers Jeff Lemire and Ray Fawkes.

Frankenstein and his creator, Mary Shelley, are an indelible part of western culture.  So much so that horror stories written by other Victorian women have been overshadowed.  Fortunately for us, Kymera Press has dug into the past and searched out horror stories by Victorian women that had been lost until now.  

As long as there are kids who love to be scared, R.L. Stine will be there, lurking in the shadows with his latest creations. Though I was just a few years older than his intended audience, I devoured his Fear Street books and later Goosebumps, all while wishing he’d published them several years earlier to scare me to sleep alongside my Stephen King novels.

I’m embarrassed to admit this: While I’ve owned every issue of Mind MGMT, this is the first time I’ve read what is now the third omnibus in the collection. I have no logical or tangible reason as to why I haven’t. The good news is that now my reaction to the third omnibus isn’t me reflecting on something I read three years ago. This is fresh in my mind, still bouncing around up there.

Jeff Lemire is not letting the library of DC superheroes go unused in his Black Hammer / Justice League: Hammer of Justice. More and more characters begin to pop up in the series, and they all have very distinct styles of dealing with the villain who is revealed in this issue.

The Twilight Zone has been cited by countless writers and directors as a major influence in television and the science fiction genre as a whole. For the past 50 years, its eerily poignant messages have remained relevant in the social and political worlds. But for its popularity, the man behind the project remains mostly a mystery. Rod Serling, a face any fan of the show could place, carefully crafted an image as an impartial observer, but who was he when the lights went off? The Twilight Man: Rod Serling and the Birth of Television seeks to shine a light on the life of television's “angry young man.”

I keep wondering if I should come back and continue to read and review Sea of Stars, because I can only do so much. After reading every issue, I’m glad that I did.

This may be the last issue of Joe Golem, and it went out on an incredibly high note.

Everything is a fever dream: a psychosomatic journey for all of its character; a mystery that doesn’t show what exactly it is that we should be trying to figure out.

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