Jem and the Holograms: Dimensions #1 is a quirky, fun read. The comic features two short stories. “Catnap,” written and drawn by Sophie Campbell and colored by Victoria Robado, follows Misfits groupie Clash as she attempts to juggle cat sitting, skiing, and Holograms-inspired pranks. Not only does this story feature a somewhat frivolous (deliciously so) storyline-- I mean, character development, sure, but the plot is light and entertaining—but Campbell and Robado have really leaned into a particular ‘80s comics vibe, featuring banana yellow and puffy white coordinated ski suits. I found it a little refreshing, too, to see the Holograms/Misfits rivalry/obsession figured in a not-so-one-sided way; it’s the Holograms, or at least their fans, that come out looking a little shady in this one.

Happy holidays, Turtle fans!  I feel like I was just writing about our favorite pizza-loving teenagers not too long ago. I can never keep track of how often our TMNT creators are delivering us new stories and comic books.  But here we are—alone at last!  Or are we?

Charles Brubaker, the creator of the advice column styled Ask a Cat trade paperback (Check out my review here.), has returned with a new collection published by Smallbug Press. The Fuzzy Princess: Volume 1 collects the first seven issues of eight stories that follows Princess “Kat” Katrina from St. Paws.

There's a lot on the line.

Rick and Morty: Book Two carries on major themes from the animated series: nihilism, human connection (or lack thereof) and family, power, and ethics, and how the heck one is supposed to care about school when offered a rotating sequence of incredibly high-stakes adventures.  That said, Rick and Morty fans will not be disappointed by Rick and Morty: Book Two, the second installment of Rick and Morty comics. This text is longer than some might expect - 290 pages in total - but interested readers shouldn’t be put off by the length; Rick and Morty: Book Two is a surprisingly fast read, both because of its form - a collection of short stories - and because the content is expertly rendered. Not only are the narratives of each story engaging, but the art and character development are - with one minor exception - in line with what readers familiar with the animated series have come to expect.

Gabriel Rodríguez’s Sword of Ages is a new series from IDW, a neo-peplum comic that combines the sword and planet genre with Arthurian legend. Sword of Ages tells a variation of the origin of the fabled Excalibur by placing the story on a different planet (portrayed as being littered with both ancient and futuristic ruins) and concerns the heroine Avalon, who has been raised by tigers and trained by monks. The first issue sees Avalon part from her tiger family to travel with Merlin (blue-skinned in this incarnation) and his black bird Nikola to rendezvous with a team of other adventurers (Trystan, Lancer Benveek, and Gawyn) and gain an audience with the serpentine Guardian of the Sacred Lake. En route, Avalon and company thwart a band of Planet of the Apes-esque slavers and free their prisoners, which introduces Captain Janek, the supposed law and order of the region.

Fellow Star Warsians! (Is that a thing? an I make this a thing?)  We are officially less than 3 weeks away from Star Wars: The Last Jedi hitting theaters, and this scruffy looking nerf herder can’t bear his excitement.  Whatever will I do to pass the lightyears?

Let me be one of the few to admit that I didn’t really like Rogue One: A Star Wars Story the first time I saw it in theaters.  It appears everyone enjoyed it more than Star Wars: The Force Awakens, except me.  

Archaia and Jim Henson Studios have created the sequel to the cult classic film, The Dark Crystal, in comic book form in Jim Henson’s The Power of the Dark Crystal. The language of this world lives in dream-like chants, giving it a sacred, poetic quality. Despite the fantasy of this realm, you trust the reality of this world and its people; they are every bit real and rich.

There’s a lot of fun to be had in this comic. Set in the early '20s in France, the art style is reflective of that era and setting, which helps to add to the immersive quality of the world in which the story takes place. The story itself is a tribute to murder mystery/adventure stories of that era and features a number of colorful characters to that effect.

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