Gideon Falls #12 begins the story of the laughing man, the entity that inhabits the Black Barn in the world of Gideon Falls. This issue is a nightmarish puzzle box that begins in 1886 on the frontier, as Father Burke and other local townspeople, including the sheriff, discover that Norton Sinclair is behind a series of murders, and they go to his barn to get him. For those who haven't been following along, Norton Sinclair is a recognizable name, and the barn is not a safe place, to put it mildly. We all know that this is the worst idea imaginable to go into the barn after Sinclair; they do not know that – but quickly find out. Father Burke is sucked into the world-altering reality of the Black Barn after coming face to face with the laughing man.

Steven Prince, the creator of Monster Matador - the epic saga of a faith-based man fighting the monsters attacking our world to protect his daughter - decided to invite fellow creator Ryland Grant (Aberrant) to write a very different type of story in the Monster Matador universe. When a monster attacks Hollywood, who better to face it than the many aspects of comic book, TV, and movie legend, Batman?  The only problem? The actors who portrayed the Caped Crusader don’t have any of Bruce Wayne’s gadgets; they just have his ego and money!

Star Wars Adventures: Tales from Vader's Castle has been on my radar for a while now. The Star Wars extended universe, both new and old canon, contains some of the greatest moments in the history of the franchise. (I'm looking at you, Star Wars Jedi Council: Acts of War.) I held off on getting into this miniseries, because I wanted to read the story as a finished product, and, luckily, that product has arrived in the form of this box set.

Jenner Faulds posed as a man to fight in the War of the Harshlands. After the war ended, she became a "Fairman" private investigator. As the only "Fairlady" in The Feld, she gets kicked the work that no one else wants. But, sometimes, the least desirable cases are the most crucial. In their new genre-blending collaboration, writer Brian Schirmer and artist Claudia Balboni drop a private eye procedural into a colorful, but perilous, fantasy world.

Looking for something directed more for the adults in the room? Something erotic, steamy, and a bit twisted? Then, Brian Azzarello and Maria Llovet bring to you Faithless. Faith is a 20-something who hangs out at coffee shops and studies occult stuff, spells, witchcraft – the usual. She also can’t get off when pleasuring herself. So, what is the issue? At this point, it’s hard to say, because while this first issue is about Faith, it’s more about Faith meeting Poppy.

I’m a few issues behind on my reviews for The Empty Man, and it’s been a pretty intense chase scene these last few issues as the world has fallen into chaos.

The first issue of Ronin Island steamrolled forward, introducing several major story elements in a jam-packed issue. Story beats came so furiously that it was difficult at times to keep your footing.

I’ve been waiting expectantly for this new story arc for months, and I don’t know if I was prepared enough going into it. The first issue of She Could Fly: The Lost Pilot left me rattled in the best possible way.

Dark Horse Comics is well known for its interesting catalog of titles. While their catalog often contains licensed comics, they also take chances on epic, new creator-owned series, including She Could Fly, a series by Christopher Cantwell, co-creator of the hit show, Halt and Catch Fire.

Time Corps is a time-traveling comic book series concerning the titular Time Corps: a ragtag group of individuals plucked from various moments of time right before they were supposed to die but now are assembled under the unifying cause of keeping history unchanged by other forces. The particular group focused on in Time Corps is the crew stationed in Venice Beach in what appears to be the present period and includes Gaius Equitus Brutus (Roman centurion who adds a neo-peplum element to the story), Smoke Jaguar (a Mayan ball player), Garabaldi Dilvorno (Prohibition-era gigolo), and Paulina Popova (Russian spy during Czarist Russia). 

Issue twelve of Time Corps focuses on the behind-the-scenes bureaucracy, red tape, and grabs for power occurring at the Celestial Bureaucracy, the overseeing organization of the Time Corps. The Inspector General and Grunfeld are at odds with each other, each running clandestine operations in conflict in the year 2657. Meanwhile, the famous Mata Hari, during a respite in an amorous encounter, is sucked out of a spaceship and into the offices of Celestial Bureaucracy. In the distant future of 3114, a technophile named Mallory takes umbrage to the dealings of the Time Corps and begins assembling her own time machine to stymie them.

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