‘Mycroft #2:’ Comic Book Review

Titan Comics brings its readers a story that will instantly transport them back to the years of Victorian England. In fact, Queen Victoria herself will require the aid of someone who is masterful with deduction. Yes, you are correct; I’m talking about Mycroft Holmes, Sherlock’s older brother.

The first few pages provide the reader with all they will need to know to understand that they’re in for an excellent ride. The cover illustrates Mycroft peering down on a creature resembling some kind of scientific experiment, with more of these things slightly hidden in the background foreshadowing the conflict ahead. The opening page provides a perfectly described synopsis, which completely explains where they are and what the main character is doing.

Mycroft Holmes and the Apocalypse Handbook is brilliantly written by NBA legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Raymond Obstfeld. These two authors craft exceptional language that flows easily from one page to the next. In this issue, Mycroft starts his investigative journey in a museum filled with advanced technological devices. As many are familiar with the Holmes’ family, Mycroft doesn’t take long to realize something’s afoot.

Many of these devices are stolen, and while the Queen and Professor try to explain the circumstances, Mycroft does the work for them; that is until a classic monster interrupts their conversation. This story doesn’t have any sluggish pauses or need to put it down, as it transports you to and from Great Britain and the United States - Philadelphia to be more precise. Along the way Mycroft shares excellent descriptions for his reasoning so those that hired him, and the reader, can easily understand his methods.

Mycroft’s methods are matched perfectly by the illustrations created by artist Joshua Cassara and colorist Luis Guerrero. These pages are filled with an amazing representation of 1870s England. The characters are dressed properly, and the colors remain balanced throughout the comic book, with the occasional glow around some of the mentioned advanced technology.

In the face of dangerous weapons, it appears only a keen mind will provide any hope of saving the day. Mycroft is a remarkably bright character who seems somewhat bored, unless he’s dabbled in some kind of mischief. This issue also further highlights some of his strengths, while exploring scientific morality and the dangers associated. It stands to reason that all readers will breeze through this well-crafted comic book.

Mycroft #2 will be available on Wednesday, September 14, in print and digital form.

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