‘Elric: The White Wolf Collection’ - Comic Book Review

I’m embarrassed to admit it, but I’ve never read Michael Moorcock’s books.  I’ve read almost every other fantasy writer, but, for some reason, I never got around to him. As I bow my head in shame, I can say that I finally know what has fascinated readers about the sword, Stormbringer, and the White Wolf (a.k.a. Elric of Melniboné).  Like all heroes (or anti-heroes), they carry a burden far greater than any of us could bear.

This third book in the series follows Elric a year after he has left his home on Dragon Isle to protect his country and his true love from himself.  Stumbling upon a group of slave traders, Elric slays them, temporarily satisfying the needs of his sword. One of the slaves is a Count of the Purple Isles who enters Elric’s service until he can repay Elric for freeing him.  It isn’t long before a mystical wolf appears with the medallion of the city of Dhakos. Both men feel this is a call of some kind and travel there. It isn’t long before Elric’s services are required by a woman searching for her lost love.

The art by Julien Telo and Robin Recht is lush and violent.  This is a hostile world, where the coloring literally makes you feel the cold through the icy breath of the horses.  The paneling moves smoothly through the action, and I love how the splash pages are used.  Even though this is the third in the series, the writers did a terrific job of creating an almost standalone chapter. I never felt like I was missing anything, though I’m guessing there was some background information that I did not catch due to lack of familiarity; however, I found it intriguing that for such a violent character, Elric is a romantic. That weakness (and strength) gets him into trouble.   My favorite character is definitely Stormbringer, the sword who demands intelligent souls to feed upon.  I’d also like to know if there is a book (or story) which centers on it.

So, yes, I’m definitely intrigued, and now I want to go out and read all of them.


Creative Team: Written and adapted by Julien Bondel and Jean-Luc Cano, Based on the novels by Michael Moorcock, Art by Julien Telo and Robin Recht, Colors by Jean Bastide, Translated by Edward Gauvin, Lettering by Kirsten Murray
Publisher:  Titan Comics


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