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Comics (1072)

Black Badge by Matt Kindt, Tyler Jenkins, and Hilary Jenkins is just getting warmed up. Gone is the episodic feel of the first three issues, as the hyper-advanced boy scout soldiers begin to unravel a mystery that has already begun to shake their foundations as a no-questions-asked team. With some serious revelations come larger questions and an expanded universe of characters.

Upon finishing The Flutter Collection, you will be filled with a million questions, and none of them will be, “Why did I read this?” You will have questions, though - questions that you will not likely be able to answer. You will need to reach out to others for answers. Thus, you will learn and be made better for it. You will be challenged and be made to overcome these challenges. That is why you read it. To accept others, and be yourself, accepted.

She is a feral child. He is a broken old man. They brandish hot blades. They make short work of nasty, bearded vikings. They take no notice of the blood left behind. Together, they are Sword Daughter.

You can only withhold information from the audience for so long before they start to become impatient. Cullen Bunn, the writer of Cold Spots and many other exceptional horror genre books on the market, was toeing this line while dancing around answers in issue three of Cold Spots. Those questions are answered in issue four, and now the heroes are left with choices to be made. That, to me, is the most interesting part of story. Yeah, a mystery is good, but if it gets in the way of characters being forced to make life-or-death decisions in the moment, then it’s not going to be nearly as exciting.

By now, you've probably encountered Disney’s Tsum Tsum at least once. If you haven't, they're basically a line of tiny stuffed animals that come from Japan based on Disney characters ranging from Mickey Mouse to Iron Man. Tsum Tsum have become something of a cultural phenomenon, leading to spin-off materials of all shapes and sizes, including today's comic: Disney’s Tsum Tsum Kingdom.



Elizabeth Dumn is a rude, 16-year-old, devil-stomping problem child, and it’s time we all start being a little more like her.

The Ash is back on the streets in a deadly Game of Thrones of horror necromancy. Bone Parish #4: The Fade starts off at the top of the roller coaster that issue #3 left us on. From there, it’s a straight shot down with lots of wild turns for the reader to brave.

Gideon Falls is a mystery - both a psychological mystery and a supernatural mystery. The characters are tied together by threads, their individual histories creating a tapestry that’s slowly weaving together to form a greater picture, a picture that revolves around an ominous structure called the Black Barn, which feels right out of one of David Lynch’s nightmares. Presumably, inside this structure is a creature made of red eyes, shadows, and a smile that’s all teeth – too many teeth. The creature - or demon - spirit is unnatural in a way that doesn’t feel like it can be drawn, that it just sort of lives somewhere between the reality on the page and the space you’re inhabiting. It’s that feeling you get when you’re lying in your bed at night and you think you feel something staring at you from your open closet or in the shadows across the room. It’s this unnerving sensation that something is just out of sight - that can’t quite be given words - that affects all of the characters of Gideon Falls.

I’ve often heard the television show, Firefly, described as the best 14 hours of your life, followed by a lifetime of disappointment. It’s true. One of the greatest sci-fi shows ever created ended much too soon. Despite the follow-up movie (Serenity), some other releases via various media, and a massive, post-cancellation cult following fifteen years later, there’s been no solid comeback for the show in any format. And, with each passing year, it seems we will never experience the adventures of Captain Mal and his band of mismatched ruffians on television again.

God of War #1 is loud. God of War #1 is hard. God of War #1 is lush and full of ashy muscles frequently flexed and toned by its stoic protagonist, Kratos.

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