The following is an interview with Brandon Rhiness and Barb Briggs, creators of the upcoming TV series, Super Dryclearns, on Telus Optik. In this interview, Fanbase Press Editor-in-Chief Barbra Dillon chats with Rhiness and Briggs about the inspiration for the series, the process by which their series was picked up for production, what they hope that audiences will take away from the show, and more!

Gotham is the crime drama series based on DC Comics’ Batman universe. Having premiered on Fox in the autumn of 2014, the show initially focused on young versions of James Gordon (Ben McKenzie) and Bruce Wayne (David Mazouz). Over time, though, the series introduced younger iterations of well-known villains in the Batman franchise, as well as lesser-known characters to provide a wider representation of the Dark Knight’s universe. Additionally, with Season Two, the episodes were grouped into “Rise of the Villains” (Episodes 1-11) and “Wraith of the Villains” (Episode 12-22), and that concept was continued in Season Three, with Episodes 1-14 grouped into “Mad Love” and Episodes 15-22, under the subtitle of “Heroes Rise.”

Justice League: The Flashpoint Paradox is quite possibly one of the greatest DC animated films ever created. So, when it was announced that The Flash television series (CW) would explore the concept in Season 3, a resounding cheer echoed from DC fans everywhere. Just before they had that collective, “Oh, crap, what now?” tension creep into their brains.

After spending the last week binging Supergirl Season 2, my head is swimming with thoughts and emotions about the second year of this show. The short review is: It’s fantastic. If you like Arrow or The Flash, you can’t go wrong watching Supergirl. If you like engaging characters, dynamics, and good romances with pretty people, you can’t go wrong watching Supergirl. If you liked Wonder Woman and want to see more optimistic superheroines, you can’t go wrong watching Supergirl.

Doctor Who: Series 10 has come to an end, and it turned out to be Steven Moffat’s best season as showrunner.

If next week’s episode is as good as “World Enough and Time,” then the two-part finale of Doctor Who: Series 10 could end up being Steven Moffat’s best writing in his tenure on the show.  The penultimate episode of Series 10 was brilliantly terrifying and suspenseful.

“Come to Jesus” brings American Gods: Season One to a close, and there is a lot to unpack in this episode.  Fans of the book are treated to some surprises, as the show pushes the narrative in some interesting new directions. Those that are new to the world of American Gods also got some answers this week.

“The Eaters of Light” saw the return of classic Who writer Rona Munro who wrote “Survival”—the final story in the original run of Doctor Who.

Surprisingly, the penultimate episode for the first season of American God was missing the show’s protagonist and antagonist.  Shadow and Mr. Wednesday were nowhere to be seen; although, Wednesday’s messengers made an appearance.

Before I begin the actual review of this week’s episode, I feel the need to point out how strange it is that “Empress of Mars” aired the day after Adam West’s passing and is coincidentally an homage to his movie, Robinson Crusoe on Mars.  It seems only fitting that one iconic '60s show is paying tribute to the star of another iconic '60s show while the world mourns the actor's loss.

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