As long as there are kids who love to be scared, R.L. Stine will be there, lurking in the shadows with his latest creations. Though I was just a few years older than his intended audience, I devoured his Fear Street books and later Goosebumps, all while wishing he’d published them several years earlier to scare me to sleep alongside my Stephen King novels.

I’m embarrassed to admit this: While I’ve owned every issue of Mind MGMT, this is the first time I’ve read what is now the third omnibus in the collection. I have no logical or tangible reason as to why I haven’t. The good news is that now my reaction to the third omnibus isn’t me reflecting on something I read three years ago. This is fresh in my mind, still bouncing around up there.

Jeff Lemire is not letting the library of DC superheroes go unused in his Black Hammer / Justice League: Hammer of Justice. More and more characters begin to pop up in the series, and they all have very distinct styles of dealing with the villain who is revealed in this issue.

On the Night Border is a collection of fifteen horror short stories by New York-based writer James Chambers. The stories within the collection are a mixture of previously published stories and ones appearing for the very first time. The tones and subgenres of the stories vary, from ghost tales (“Lost Daughters”) to possession (“Marco Polo”) to rich folks who have a dark, evil side to them (“The Many Hands Inside the Mountain” and “Picture Man”). Some stories dabble in other universes and IPs, such as Cthulhu Mythos-compatible stories (“A Song Left Behind in the Aztakea Hills,” “Odd Quahogs”), Lin Carter’s Anton Zarnak (“A Wandering Blackness”), Robert W. Chambers’ The King in Yellow (“The Chamber of Last Earthly Delights”), and even '70s cult classic Kolchak the Night Stalker (“Kolchak the Night Stalker: The Lost Boy”).

The Twilight Zone has been cited by countless writers and directors as a major influence in television and the science fiction genre as a whole. For the past 50 years, its eerily poignant messages have remained relevant in the social and political worlds. But for its popularity, the man behind the project remains mostly a mystery. Rod Serling, a face any fan of the show could place, carefully crafted an image as an impartial observer, but who was he when the lights went off? The Twilight Man: Rod Serling and the Birth of Television seeks to shine a light on the life of television's “angry young man.”

I keep wondering if I should come back and continue to read and review Sea of Stars, because I can only do so much. After reading every issue, I’m glad that I did.

This may be the last issue of Joe Golem, and it went out on an incredibly high note.

Everything is a fever dream: a psychosomatic journey for all of its character; a mystery that doesn’t show what exactly it is that we should be trying to figure out.

The third issue of Berserker Unbound take a somber tone as the titular Berserker resigns to his fate that he is stuck with the homeless man Cobb. The two retreat from the city back to Cobb’s forest encampment and begin to bond over drinks that the Berserker had purchased with his golden coins. The Berserker is still very much in mourning after the loss of his wife and child, and after two teenage hooligans threaten Cobb and are subsequently chased off, he learns that Cobb has lost his family to an accident, as well. It is at that moment that the portal that brought the Berserker to the present-day, big-city activities and a new threat emerge for the Berserker.

I haven't had the opportunity to talk about Avatar: The Last Airbender in a review before now. Generally considered one of the greatest cartoons of all time, The Last Airbender has seen no shortage of success in its brief fourteen-year history. From a popular followup series, to a solid continuation of the narrative in graphic novels like Avatar: The Last Airbender: The Search and The Rift, to a universally panned live-action film, The Last Airbender has continued to live long after the show concluded. Which brings us to Avatar: The Last Airbender: Team Avatar Tales.

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