Writer, artist, and graphic designer Mickey Lam first made his mark as an independent comic book creator with the quirky Mr. Yang Fights Aliens.  For indie creators and especially multi-hyphenate indie creators, it takes time to develop, create, and produce new works, which is why it is so wonderful to see those creators return with exciting, new projects.  Lam has done exactly that this year with the release of his all-ages adventure comic, Fwendly Fwuit: Winter Wonders, and the new comic is an adorable and fun read for young audiences to enjoy.

Since Jonesy first began, one of the most interesting characters has been Jonesy’s secret crush, Stuff. A teen pop sensation with an odd sci-fi persona, he’s thus far been mainly in the background - talked about and seen in video clips, rather than appearing directly. Until now. In this issue, we finally get to meet the legendary Stuff.

“This sunroof is where I have greeted the day for a year. I’m an ocean away from the job I have dutifully served since college in Taipei, Taiwan, providing logistical support to Chinese separatists, part of California’s covert Cary Grant Brigade. Life has been different for some since China succeeded and the U.S. lost the scramble for the world’s last oil supplies – but not for me. I’m still broke.”

It’s 2046, and struggling LaLaLander journalist Richard “Dick” White is living a bohemian existence on the edges of a Venice, CA, not much different from our own.  Except that California and the Western States seceded after the government didn’t provide relief after the great Earthquake of 2026, and the region is now more prosperous than the rest of the country.

In case you missed my review of Spectrum #0, here’s a short synopsis of everything you need to know to understand Spectrum’s place in the macro-verse of Con Man and Firefly.

Mark Millar has written some of the most unforgiving and violently brutal comics out there. From the awesome Old Man Logan to the pop culture-infused Kick Ass, his books have a visceral edge to them. He was one of the weekly targets of internet outrage a while back due to his brutality. To prove his naysayers wrong, he began delving into other arenas and proved he didn’t need to depict immense violence in his story to make it dramatically potent. He’s largely succeeded. I like Millar’s work, and, sometimes, I even love it.

The Hunt - created, written, and illustrated by Colin Lorimer - is a horror story that is a little off the beaten path, and I don’t just mean its Irish locale.

Anyone following my reviews will know that I've already said my piece about every single issue in this limited series, in which I lauded the team on Magekiller for making something pretty great. That being said, when it was time for the trade to hit shelves, I once again jumped at the chance to give this book another shot, especially since I'd be able to read it as a whole and not just in parts from month to month. So, here's another look at Dragon Age: Magekiller, a series so good, I volunteered to review it twice.

The surprise hit of last month (at least for me) has returned with its follow up, and the sophomore issues of Cryptocracy doesn't disappoint.

I know a number of people who, when confronted with any sort of story involving time travel - from Primer to Back to the Future - will say, “I don’t understand time travel stories. They’re confusing.” If this accurately reflects your own attitude towards time travel, then stay far, far away from Past Aways. It will have you scratching your head practically from the first page and only gets more complicated from there; however, if you’re more like me and eagerly devour time-travel fiction in any form you can find, then this is definitely the comic for you. The story is strange and intricately crafted and a whole lot of fun from beginning to end.

Finally! It's that time of the month! Naturally, I'm talking about my monthly visit to my local comic book shop to pick up the latest edition of Lara Croft's adventures, Tomb Raider.

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