Quick recap: Things are heating up on all fronts in Invisible Kingdom. Grix and Turo have an uneasy truce at the moment, but things don’t look to stay that way for long. Meanwhile, Vess’ feelings for Grix become apparent to all but Grix.

As the popularity of Critical Role rises, the Dungeons & Dragons-based actual play show and entertainment studio has been asked for more and more content relating to the heroes portrayed by the incredibly talented cast. Not a group to lose out on a chance to do something they obviously love, Critical Role has teamed for the last few years with Dark Horse Comics to produce stories based on their beloved group of idiot adventurers, Vox Machina. Since the streaming show of the Vox Machina campaign started well after the titular group began their journey, there are plenty of stories to share. With that, the stories contained within the Dark Horse Comics series are all based on what happened when the group met and started working together to become the saviors of Exandria. Now on its second chapter, Vox Machina: Origins focuses on a well-told story of the time they saved Grog from a mind control spell, thereby saving the realm from an untold evil.

Killswitch continues its thematic journey of depicting the oppressed looking to escape to a better life. 

Stan Lee worked in the comic book industry since the late 1930s and was integral to the evolution of Marvel Comics and the “Marvel Style.”  For seventy years, he was a writer and editor who co-created the Mighty Marvel Universe, including fan favorites Spider-Man, The Avengers, and the Incredible Hulk.  Lee worked with many rising stars and established creators over the decades, endowing him with invaluable knowledge about the industry.  As a veteran and legend, Lee shared his experience in a series of books that includes Stan Lee’s How to Draw Comics, Stan Lee’s How to Write Comics, and Stan Lee’s How to Draw Superheroes.  And, last month, the fourth book of the series, Stan Lee’s Master Class, was released by Watson-Guptill (Penguin Random House).  

The following is an interview with Jon Sprunk regarding the release of his new fantasy novel, Sun and Serpent. In this interview, Fanbase Press Editor-in-Chief Barbra Dillon chats with Sprunk about the inspiration behind the novel (which serves as part four within The Book of the Black Earth series), his creative process in bringing the story to life, what readers can anticipate from this latest installment in the series, and more!

Exploring the eerie forests in Japan, this ethereal, four-issue series is collected into a trade paperback with great depth of self.

Watching or reading Alejandro Jodorowsky's work is an experience for the soul, acting as a meditation for the transcendence of ourselves. His audience is constantly asked not to trust him, but to believe in him. He explores the occult, Jungian philosophy, and the esoteric; however, an undeniable consideration of El Topo involves the sexual assault that occurred between Jodorowsky and The Woman’s actress, Mara Lorenzio, which may have brought about her decision to not continue an exploration of her talents. While Jodorowsky has gone on record saying that the act was merely “surrealist publicity,” it has required consideration in how an audience views Jodorowsky’s work.

The indie comic book series, Mindframe, entangles readers in a story that captures the antagonism of the horrible and the boring, putting these feelings in constant awareness of each other. In other words, Mindframe is wholly Lynchian in the best possible. Writer/artist David Tucker makes his debut as someone who has mastered nuanced storytelling. Within one issue, he presents three different segments of time, all coherently connecting the premise with the characters. Tucker's exposition is masterful in that it serves to reveal the true nature of the characters, providing a surreal narrative akin to creators like David Lynch, Brian De Palma, William Friedkin, and Nicolas Winding Refn. In terms of comparison with other comic book visionaries, look no further than Grant Morrison in terms of his eclectic panel layouts and visually distinct means of storytelling.

What if the descendants of pregnant African slave women, thrown overboard for being too burdensome to their kidnappers, become merpeople and developed a new culture and community under the sea? That’s the premise behind Rivers Solomon’s novella, The Deep.

When the comic of Crisis on Infinite Earths came out, it was a celebration of DC's characters across several generations.  The new crossover event on The CW is now a celebration of the numerous film and TV adaptations that those comics inspired.

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