The fourth and final chapter in the first story arc of Tales from Harrow County is haunting and beautiful.

We're back one last time with the Young Adventurer's Guide series of Dungeons & Dragons books. At least for now, Dungeons & Dragons: Wizards & Spells will be the last in a series that captured my heart back in July of 2019. If you haven’t been following the series, it began with Warriors & Weapons, followed by Monsters & Creatures, and then Dungeons & Tombs. Now, Wizards & Spells wraps up the ensemble by diving into the magic at the heart of D&D.

Transmissions is a new, four-issue series published by UK-based publisher TPub. Writer/letterer Jed McPherson (Jacob, Deadbeat) heads up the creative team and is joined by artist Marco Perugini (Samuel Stern, Heavy Metal), colorist Shannon Bennion (If We Shadows), and editor Neil Gibson (Twisted Dark) who is also the founder/CEO of TPUb.

Jane Stitch doesn’t know who she is. This isn’t the result of some variety of amnesia or a run-of-the-mill case of existential angst. No, Jane is having an issue with her identity because she is a monster of the “made by Frankenstein” variety. She is literally made up of half a dozen different women, and these women are starting to encroach on what peace of mind Jane has been able to find.

Issue #12 of the post-apocalyptic bullfighter series, Monster Matador, feels like an epic finale.  Ramon faces off against his most dangerous foe to date while trying to protect his daughter and their companions as a third party advances on the arena.  The lines between friends and enemies blur, as the intrepid matador relies on his faith and ingenuity to guide everyone to peace.

In Don’t Go Without Me, cartoonist Rosemary Valero-O’Connell brings us three tales about the fragility of existence, memory, and intimate connection. We encounter fantastic creatures, mind-bending technology, and imaginative new worlds. And we discover the strangest frontier of all: the labyrinth of human emotion.

Love can be a real monster some days, but what happens when a spouse in a failing marriage turns into a zombie? In The Empties, writer Kristen Renee Gorlitz explores this intriguing concept, meshing the personal and horrific into a fast-paced and dramatic read.

This is not your typical murder-in-a-small-town-type of story. I mean, sure, there is murder, and, yes, it happens in a seemingly typical small town, but there is so much more to Something Is Killing the Children. Children all over Archer’s Peak are disappearing and dying. Young James is the sole survivor of a sleepover gone bad, where something killed his best friends. Now an outcast, James comes across a mysterious stranger who shows up asking him detailed questions about that fearful night. Her name is Erica Slaughter, and she kills monsters.

A shocking revelation about the farm starts Frank on a destructive path. Plagued by nightmares and increasingly unhinged, there is no one Frank can trust, including himself, as he desperately searches for answers. The independently published third installment of writer Jordan Thomas and artist Clark Bint's Frank at Home on the Farm continues to draw the reader in and leave them wanting more.

In space, far beyond the galaxy that we Earthlings know and love, lives the Outer Darkness.  John Layman fans have chewed on the new sci-fi series since 2018, and this may be the start of his most fulfilling story yet.  The self-proclaimed science fiction geek, best known for the Eisner Award-winning series, Chew, has been working full-time on his new passion project with artist Afu Chan.  The new series is imaginative and unique in all the best ways, but still die-hard fans of the Chew series have pondered if we'd see Tony, Colby, and Poyo ever again.  Not since issue #60 has the courageous Cibopath and his adventures graced the Image Comics catalog.  Until now.  Outer Darkness / Chew is the crossover event that comic book fans never knew they wanted but deserve more than ever.   

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