In his introduction, writer/translator Zack Davisson discusses the accidental beginnings of the feline character, Michael, who appeared in a How to Draw Manga instructional guide by Makoto Kobayashi in 1982.  The cute feline was a departure for Kobayashi who had been writing/illustrating sports-oriented stories targeting young boys.  His editor knew that Michael was special and, as a result, the What’s Michael? series was born.

The following is an interview with writer/artist Johnnie Christmas (Firebug, Sheltered, Pisces) and artist Jack T. Cole (The Unsound, Epicurean's Exile) regarding the upcoming release of their comic book series, Tartarus, from Image Comics. In this interview, Fanbase Press Editor-in-Chief Barbra Dillon chats with Christmas and Cole about the inspiration behind the series, Christmas' transition from artist to writer for the project, their shared creative process, what they hope that audiences will take away from Tartarus, and more!

Here at Fanbase Press, we strive to provide an outlet for up-and-coming creators to promote and showcase their incredible works. With thousands of creators utilizing crowdfunding platforms like Kickstarter and Indiegogo to make those works a reality, we will highlight these talented creators and their noteworthy campaigns through #CrowfundingFridays! We hope that you will join us in giving these projects a moment of your time (and possibly your support)!

Captain Jean-Luc Picard. My favorite character. I have so much fondness for a fictional character that I wrote a geeky love letter to Sir Patrick Stewart a few years ago. Captain Picard was more than a wonderful role model. He was an outlet, an escape of the emptiness I felt as a young boy and teenager. There was meaning behind his words. He had a duty to uphold. Yes, there was the Starfleet’s Prime Directive, but, in the end, his ultimate duty came to serving and protecting those he commanded on the Starship Enterprise (NCC-1701-D), and doing the right thing.

“Between the Panels” is a bi-weekly interview series focusing on comic book creators of all experience levels, seeking to examine not just what each individual creates, but how they go about creating it.

It’s not often these days that I’ll see a movie in the theatre more than once. Who has time? It has to be something really special - truly unique - to draw me back in for a repeat, big-screen presentation. I just finished my second viewing of Richard Stanley’s Color Our of Space, based on the H.P. Lovecraft short story. I fell immediately in love with the film, which I had incredibly high expectations for upon my first viewing. The second viewing not only confirmed that love, but nourished it.

The After Realm is a well-written tale from one of my favorite artists: Michael Avon Oeming. While the first 99% of the story tackles what is a fantasy adventure tale about a young Elven ranger named Oona, the final page of the comic opens the flood gates to what might be a pretty bonkers, post-fantasy world overridden by the elements of chaos.

Gideon Falls hits a crossroads as it wraps up its fourth story arc. The great evil known as the Smiling Man is getting ever closer to what he wants: Danny. The rest of the characters try their damnedest to fight back. Although, how do you grapple with something that lies beyond comprehension? Is a victory a real victory? Is a defeat a real defeat? My mind is bent. Every step that creators Lemire, Sorrentino, Stewart, and Wand take is even more unexpected than the previous one. This is storytelling on a mythic scale. At the same time, it never loses sight of the personal journeys of its characters within this expansive, breathtaking puzzle.

Described in its simplest terms as “Goth Jumanji,Die is several things all at once. It's a comic book series, a role-playing game, a comic series about a role-playing game, and - like more popular fare such as Dungeons & Dragons - Die is a way for those playing or reading to exorcise some of their demons through the guise of a fictional world. Though, tell that to the group of long-suffering adults who've found themselves trapped inside the tabletop game created by their friend.

Linsey Miller charmed me with her cutthroat, fantastical debut novel, Mask of Shadows, featuring a gender non-binary protagonist fighting for a spot as one of the Queen’s assassins.  When I received the opportunity to review her latest stand-alone tale about two young women who trade lives to attain their true dreams, I jumped on it, hoping for something unique and timely in a fantasy setting.  Ms. Miller did not disappoint.

Page 3 of 325
Go to top