Halo 3: ODST, recycles the gameplay of earlier Halo games, which is not necessarily a bad thing, while it brings a few new things to the table.

 

The most obvious addition to the series is Firefight, a cooperative mode that throws wave after wave of enemies at up to four players. This is insanely fun. As the game progresses, the enemies get harder to beat, while the game also turns on skulls, which are the Halo version of cheat codes, that make the game even harder. I could get bogged down in the minutiae of this mode, but I will just say that it is really fun and you should try it.

It would be a mistake to call The Hurt Locker the most intense movie I have ever seen in the the theater. While true, this doesn't communicate the complicated personal story being told. The movie follows an Army bomb removal squad in Baghdad in 2004. Staff Sergeant William James, played by Jeremy Renner, is almost pathologically addicted to risk. As the new bomb tech in the squad, he is incredibly skilled and reckless. As the commanding officer in the unit, he has the authority to make incredibly dangerous decisions. The squad is rounded out by Anthony Mackie and Brian Geraghty, as Sergeant JT Sanborn and Specialist Owen Eldridge, respectively. Both of these actors do a fine job with characters that seem less complicated because they are missing that huge flaw. Mackie and Geraghty resist the urge to play it big and melodramatic, bringing a humanity to the hell.

 

The most obvious area where this movie excels is in the combat. Bigelow treats every encounter with a bomb as a battle. On the one side is the army. On the opposition is the insurgency. But how do you fight an enemy which looks like, and has learned to act like, the innocent population? This question leads to some of the most intense scenes in the film.

As Fyodor Dostoevsky brilliantly displayed throughout his novel, Crime and Punishment, money united the most saintly and sinister of characters, as their eventual moral degradation heavily depended on their possession of it or lack thereof.  By highlighting the characters Rodya Raskolnikov and Arkady Svidrigailov, Dostoevsky illustrated that all people, when faced with extreme economic conditions, possessed the ability to become immoral, self-involved, and ultimately evil.  To remedy these issues of self-centeredness, pride, and greed, the underlying motif of the novel, poverty, demonstrated the need for ideals of self-sacrifice and compassion.  Accompanied by the theme of self-alienation, the author attempted to convince the reader that the battle against moral degradation would only be won by bonding together in times of poverty.  In essence, while Dostoevsky clearly depicted that this moral demotion was prevalent in society, he was certain to explain that this occurrence was unacceptable and needed to be rectified.       

The following is an interview with actor James Urbaniak and actress Annie Savage prior to their performances at the Thrilling Adventure Hour.  They spoke with Fanboy Comics Creative Director Sam Rhodes about the process of voice acting and recording podcasts in front of a live audience.

 

This interview was conducted on April 2, 2011.

 

 

 

CLICK HERE TO WATCH THE INTERVIEW

The following is an interview with musicians Sara and Sean Watkins prior to their performances at the Thrilling Adventure Hour. They spoke with Fanboy Comics Creative Director Sam Rhodes about the process of voice acting and recording podcasts in front of a live audience.

This interview was conducted on April 2, 2011.

 

 

 

CLICK HERE TO WATCH THE INTERVIEW

The following is an interview with actors Colin Hanks and John DiMaggio prior to their performances at the Thrilling Adventure Hour. They spoke with Fanboy Comics Creative Director Sam Rhodes about the process of voice acting and recording podcasts in front of a live audience.  DiMaggio also shared some top-secret info about the new season of Futurama starting in June!

 

This interview was conducted on April 4, 2011.

 

 

 

CLICK HERE TO WATCH THE INTERVIEW

It’s no secret that the Broadway show Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark has been plagued by numerous cast injuries, poor writing, and bad press.  Given the $65 million price that went towards production of the show, many are left wondering why so much money was spent in the first place.  In the wake of this catastrophic disaster emerged a show that many hope will turn theatre on its head.  Created by writer Justin Moran (POPE! The Musical), The Spidey Project: With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility is a guerilla-style theatre production that aims to write, rehearse, and perform a Spider-Man-inspired musical within 30 days on a $0 budget.  The show is scheduled for two performances on March 14th at the Peoples Improv Theatre in NYC.  

The following is an interview with actor and improviser Ryan Nelson, who co-stars in The Spidey Project.  Ryan can be seen at The Magnet Theater in New York City in POPE! The Musical, performing musical improvisation with Choral Rage, and playing once a year with the super group Under Your Bed.

This interview was conducted on Tuesday, March 8, 2011.

 

The following is an interview with writer/artist Michael Troy, whose Taylor Swift artwork will appear in the April issue of FAME by Bluewater Publishing.  Troy’s previous work includes graphic novels like The Blonde Squad and The Boy Who Loved Magnificent Woman, and he can also be seen performing in comedy clubs throughout Los Angeles.

 

This interview was conducted on Sunday, March 13, 2011.

 

The following is an interview with Mark Jeffrey, writer of the Young-Adult series Max Quick.  He is also an internet entrepreneur who currently serves as the CEO of the ThisWeekIn network of podcast television shows.   In the following interview, Jeffrey explains his motivation behind the Max Quick series, his desire to transition from novel to film, and the similarities and differences between being a writer and an internet entrepreneur.  

This interview was conducted on Sunday, March 13, 2011.

 

 

The following is an interview with actor Kerem Bursin, who co-stars in the SyFy original film Sharktopus.  Bursin shared his thoughts with Fanboy Comics Managing Editor Barbra Dillon on his Sharktopus character, working with B-movie great Roger Corman, and the challenge of working with CG technology.  Special thanks to Ellen Tremiti for her assistance in securing this interview!


This interview was conducted on Monday, April 4, 2011.

 

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