Steven W. Alloway, Fanbase Press Contributor

Steven W. Alloway, Fanbase Press Contributor

This is a good film and worth watching, but it suffers from one major problem: The title is extremely misleading. If you go in expecting an epic team-up between two awesome and popular DC animated series, leading to mayhem in the multiverse, you will be disappointed.

The title of this latest DC Animated offering is a little misleading. At first glance, I assumed it would be a feature-length film, revolving around Constantine. Instead, it’s a series of shorts, which they call the DC Showcase. Constantine: The House of Mystery is just one of them, followed by three others, all standalones.

This new story arc is being released in honor of the 40th anniversary of The Rocketeer. Wait—40 years? That can’t be right! Didn’t it come out in 1991?

The story explored in this issue of Jim Henson’s The Storyteller is a bit different from the previous one—as well as from the original series. The tale is set in a relatively modern setting, seemingly around the 20th century. Does that make it any less of a folktale, or any less worthy to be included in this collection? Not at all.  It’s just as magical, just as timeless, and just as engaging as The Storyteller’s usual fare. It also may or may not have made me cry.

At Last the Light is a gothic horror comic set in 19th century Edinburgh. If you’re me, that’s pretty much all you’ll need to be sold on this comic. Most of you are not me, however, so I’ll have to elaborate a bit more.

It’s difficult to review any animated Batman series without comparing it to Batman: The Animated Series. The early '90s series has now become, essentially, the gold standard for animated Batman fare. The creators of The Batman, which ran a little over a decade later, from 2004 to 2008, were well aware of this. So, they made it their goal to set their series apart from TAS as much as possible.

Things are heating up in Stellar City, dear reader, as our intrepid police detectives, Sawse and Trustah, continue their downward trudge into the heart of the city’s underworld—or if not the heart, at least a kidney. There’s a whole lot of underworld to cover in Stellar City, and the triple homicide they’re investigating is fairly low on the police force’s priority list. Which may just mean it’s the key to everything.

Jim Henson’s The Storyteller was a creative and captivating show that did all sorts of strange and wonderful things with fairytales from all different cultures. It put new twists on old tales—some familiar, some less so—and made them come alive as only the Jim Henson Company could. As a fan of all things Henson, as well as all types of folklore, the show was pretty much tailor-made for me. So, needless to say, I was very excited to read and review this new comic.

The more I learn about the characters in Clodagh, the more I want to know about them. In this world of magic and monsters, each of the main characters seems to have a dark and mysterious past, dealing with such things. Details of what brought any of them to this point are, heretofore, scarce, but then it’s only the second issue.

The Boston Metaphysical Society never disappoints. Madeleine Holly-Rosing seamlessly combines sci-fi with the supernatural to create adventures that are always fun and rarely expected. And Book of Demons is no exception.

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