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Well, it happened again. Image Comics let Ryan Browne and Charles Soule make another series. Regardless of how good of an idea that is for the world at large, Eight Billion Genies is here, and it's just as delightfully ridiculous as anything else these two creators have put out. Somehow, they managed to put Browne's previous hit, God Hates Astronauts (as well as their previous collaboration, Curse Words), to shame, and we've only gotten the first issue.

In Metal Society, robots dominate the Earth, and humans are extinct—until the robots get bored and decide to reintroduce humans back into society. 

Move over Yon, Mu, Chi, and Michael, there’s a new feline in town!  Musubi is an adorable tuxedo kitten who strayed from his mother and siblings and is found by a security guard at Riko’s place of employment.  As each employee offers up a reason for not taking the kitten, Riko, a single 20-something woman, finds herself saying she’ll take the stray feline home.  

Quick recap: Well, the last time around, I said there were two legendary Arthurs vying for the throne. Silly me… Gillen et al. threw in a third version. “Extra” does not seem to begin to describe this book… but then again, I don’t think they’ve ever shied away from over the top.

Dave Stevens was an illustrator with an incredibly diverse list of credits. He began his career as an assistant to Russ Manning, inking on comic strips like Tarzan and Star Wars in the 1970s. He also drew storyboards on various projects, ranging from Hanna Barbara’s Superfriends cartoon to movies like Raiders of the Lost Ark. In the early 1980s, he became one of the first independent comic creators to succeed with his own character; he created an adventure comic set in the 1930s that was inspired by classic pulp adventures: The Rocketeer.

Who doesn’t like a good, old-fashioned mystery? Especially when it takes place around the turn of the century and features tarot cards, as well as thought transference, small villages with strange residents, and spooky cemeteries? That’s what awaits the reader in the first issue of Dark Horse Comics’ The British Paranormal Society: Time Out of Mind.

After a disastrous encounter with the Tax Collector and his goons, the crew is on a time crunch to get the medical supplies Simon needs to save a life. Issue #3 has a few surprises thrown in for good measure, and there are a few character moments that feel like they’re building up to something big.

Ruby is back 150% as the Geek-Girl I fell in love with in the first mini-series as she faces off with another nemesis on the cover of Geek-Girl #9.  I had no clue who the sunglass-wearing blond lady might be, but watching Ruby go hand to hand with another super is part of what drew me into this world.   It also gave me hope that we’d see some intense match ups after a few issues focusing on introspection and character development (all great things, but I was ready for some exciting action).

Redemption and second chances. It’s that type of character, flawed but seeking deliverance from their past in the world, that we love to see. The underdog. The wronged. Those fighting for justice. All these themes are prevalent in Eden, a ComiXology Originals graphic novel.

Set in an alternate universe that was briefly glimpsed in BOOM!’s first foray into Buffy the Vampire Slayer and the 25th Anniversary Special, The Vampire Slayer sees Willow taking on the titular mantle, with Giles as her Watcher, and Buffy and Xander as her Scoobies. While much of the dynamic seems familiar, this is definitely a different side of Willow and Buffy’s relationship.

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