I am tied at the hip to Erica Slaughter’s journey. I care so much about this character, as much as I do about Ripley from the Alien franchise, or Lisbeth Salander from The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo series. Entering into this story arc, we know how the events will turn out, but not why, and not to what extent it reveals to us huge chunks of this mythology and the other characters.

With issue #5, the story opens up and the Berzerker deepens. BRZRKR has been following a path. A scientist (trying to help the Berkzerker in exchange for his help) has been cutting into who our hero is through his past and present in an attempt to help him become a mortal. Since the Berzerker can’t die, he’s been America’s wrecking ball, going on covert ops missions, dropping out of airplanes, and laying destruction every where he goes. He was born for it, or was he trained for it? Did his father turn him into a killing machine? Two big questions exist at the center of this story: What makes us who we are, and how do we stop being that person?

The rundown: This is an exploration of a very specific time in the life of an oft-sidelined character. Simon Tam takes center stage here, and the good doctor is on a mission to save his Mei-Mei from the clutches of the Alliance.

In a post-apocalyptic world, who would be best equipped for survival? When the world has turned to a barren wasteland, deadly monsters roam the countryside, heavily armed gangs attack innocent people, and everyone has to fight tooth and nail just to find enough food to feed themselves and their families, what group of people have the necessary skills, bravery, and determination to survive and to help others survive? If you said, “The Boy Scouts,” then you’re already on board with the premise of this comic.

I had wanted to back this project on Kickstarter, but it got past me somehow. Fortunately, Caleb Palmquist was tabling at Rose City Comic Con, and I was able to pick up issue one.  A middle-grade fantasy with vampires, magic, and unicorns, I found it to be rather charming and heartwarming.

With the final living Turtle (I still won’t say which one it is for the uninitiated.) side by side again with April and her daughter Casey, the remaining puzzle pieces of the past become apparent, and the plan to take back the city back from the Foot Clan is set in motion.

Quick recap: While the gang was concerned with surviving being cast into the story, Arthur came face to face with possibly his most hated foe yet: himself. Yeah, things got really wacky…

Zetian has always struggled to be the ideal of Chinese femininity.  She loathes her useless bound feet and how her family values her brother, father, and grandfather over any of the women. When her older sister becomes a concubine to a war lord pilot and ends up dead, Zetian’s rage focuses on the system of using young women to help fuel Chrysalises (giant robots that fight against strange alien creatures outside of human civilizations) and help young men obtain military fame.  Her natural mental strength propels her to the highest concubine ranks, where she successfully overcomes her male partner while mind melded and earns the name Iron Widow, a concubine who kills any Chrysalis partner.  How will the government react to Zetian’s intense abilities, and will she be punished for the crime of murdering a war hero?  Can a young woman from the provinces rise to power in a society that prizes city-bred, educated men over everyone else? Only time will tell.

About halfway into this series, a pivotal moment occurred, and I involuntarily cackled and proclaimed, “That’s fucking cool!” Cause it was!

After Sarah and Miss LaFleur find Arlen Quincy hiding in the walls of his own house, it becomes apparent that he faked his own death. But why?

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