In 1967, Star Trek first explored the concept of parallel universes in the second season episode, "Mirror, Mirror." In it, Captain Kirk found himself in a reality in which humans had formed the Terran Empire and were brutal rulers, the opposite of the peaceful explorers the audience was so familiar with. Star Trek: Deep Space Nine revisited this universe several times, establishing that the Terran Empire was overthrown by the Klingons and the Cardassians and the human race was enslaved. In 2017, IDW began their exploration of this universe with several mini-series featuring the crew of The Next Generation. In the same continuity of DS9, remains of the Terran Empire still exist, fighting a resistance against the Klingons and Cardassians. Star Trek: The Mirror War #0 is the beginning of a 13-issue series which continues this story.

Tales of an apocalypse in the making have been popular in comics for a while. Whether it’s a zombie tale like The Walking Dead or a gender extinction like Y: The Last Man, society and humanity are always in deep trouble with little hope of survival. What makes a series like Dark Horse’s Last Flight Out unique is its timing. Coming out after (and clearly influenced by) the deadly Coronavirus pandemic, this series is able to bring in elements of real life that would have seemed to be pure fantasy a mere 2 years ago.

Last month, I momentarily thought I was going to get a new Jeff Lemire series that wasn’t related to Black Hammer. I love every moment we get in the world of Black Hammer, but I also like to dip into creators’ heads in different ways, as well. I loved, loved, loved Gideon Falls. So, when I saw Mazebook pop up, I was really excited to read it. My excitement has been appeased.

Now with two Unbelievable Unteens, their memories retrieved, they set off to find their old team members. Along the way, we find memory breadcrumbs of how the team lost their own memories and were given normal lives.

Previously on Buffy the Vampire Slayer, things were tensing up on both sides of the Slayer schism, with each side gearing up to fight a common enemy (Silas), but are they prepared to work together towards a shared goal? After a good, long while of doubting her place in the world (or multiverse!), Buffy had an epiphany about how to possibly fight a battle that’s stacked against them.  

Four issues ago, Death lost her job because someone (Darius Shah) was being born that would make her job pointless; this baby would grow up to end death. So, Death was given human form in Laila Star, and over the past four issues, we’ve seen Laila live, only to die while watching this baby grow to adulthood—always missing her chance to try and stop him before dying again.

In Black Hammer: Reborn #3, Lucy Weber’s personal life continues to crumble while something ominous builds around - or perhaps returns to - Spiral City.

The score of a lifetime awaits…but how long will that life last?

Almost 30 years ago, Todd McFalane helped create Image Comics with Spawn #1. This year, he has launched a new, ongoing Spawn title. This is the first new continuing series since 1992. How is it? That depends on the reader’s relationship to the character and setting, as well as their feelings on the content.

We're nearly there. With one more roll of the die, we will be through this journey, as the following issue of Die marks its last. This, the penultimate issue of the series, one full of twists and turns, of friendships blooming and decaying, of learning who you truly are through this nightmarish hellscape that is loosely defined as a game, is its finest yet. As the group, including undead game master and creator Sol, makes their final attempt to leave the world of Die, we find that the way out is much more complex than opening a door or finding light through a dark tunnel. Getting out means getting out of your own way, of finally admitting to yourself the things that you've hidden for so long, and using that as your way back into the real world. It's classic, in a sense. Tabletop games have, for decades, given people an opportunity to live their truest selves, to be who they want without fear of remorse or judgment. These games have helped people understand their indentity and motives, to have that moment of not trying to hide or repress anything anymore, and to take that into the real world, living free as who you were meant to be.

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